Community healthcare delivery post-hurricane sandy: Lessons from a mobile health unit

Cynthia Lien, John Raimo, Jessica Abramowitz, Sameer Khanijo, Athena Kritharis, Christopher Mason, Charles H. Jarmon, Ira S. Nash, Maria T. Carney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy the North Shore LIJ Health System (NS-LIJ HS) organized and launched its first mobile health unit (MHU) operation to some of New York's hardest hit communities including Queens County and Long Island, NY. This document describes the initiation, operational strategies, outcomes and challenges of the NS-LIJ HS community relief effort using a MHU. The operation was divided into four phases: (1) community needs assessment, (2) MHU preparation, (3) staff recruitment and (4) program evaluation and feedback. From November 16th through March 21st, 2013 the Health System launched the MHU over 64 days serving 1,160 individuals with an age range of 3 months to 91 years. Vaccination requests were the most commonly encountered issue, and the most common complaint was upper respiratory illness. The MHU is an effective resource for delivering healthcare to displaced individuals in the aftermath of natural disaster. Future directions include the provision of psychosocial services, evaluating strategies for timely retreat of the unit and methods for effective transitions of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-605
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Mobile Health Units
Cyclonic Storms
Community Health Services
Delivery of Health Care
health
community
Community Health Planning
Patient Transfer
Needs Assessment
Health
Program Evaluation
Disasters
Islands
Vaccination
vaccination
complaint
natural disaster
illness
staff

Keywords

  • Displaced populations
  • Healthcare and natural disaster
  • Healthcare delivery and outreach
  • Mobile health unit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Community healthcare delivery post-hurricane sandy : Lessons from a mobile health unit. / Lien, Cynthia; Raimo, John; Abramowitz, Jessica; Khanijo, Sameer; Kritharis, Athena; Mason, Christopher; Jarmon, Charles H.; Nash, Ira S.; Carney, Maria T.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 599-605.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lien, C, Raimo, J, Abramowitz, J, Khanijo, S, Kritharis, A, Mason, C, Jarmon, CH, Nash, IS & Carney, MT 2014, 'Community healthcare delivery post-hurricane sandy: Lessons from a mobile health unit', Journal of Community Health, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 599-605. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10900-013-9805-7
Lien, Cynthia ; Raimo, John ; Abramowitz, Jessica ; Khanijo, Sameer ; Kritharis, Athena ; Mason, Christopher ; Jarmon, Charles H. ; Nash, Ira S. ; Carney, Maria T. / Community healthcare delivery post-hurricane sandy : Lessons from a mobile health unit. In: Journal of Community Health. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 599-605.
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