Comparison of 2 resident learning tools - Interactive screen-based simulated case scenarios versus problem-based learning discussions: A prospective quasi-crossover cohort study

Shobana Rajan, Ashish Khanna, Maged Argalious, Stephen J. Kimatian, Edward J. Mascha, Natalya Makarova, Eman M. Nada, Hesham Elsharkawy, Farhad Firoozbakhsh, Rafi Avitsian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective Simulation-based learning is emerging as an alternative educational tool in this era of a relative shortfall of teaching anesthesiologists. The objective of the study is to assess whether screen-based (interactive computer simulated) case scenarios are more effective than problem-based learning discussions (PBLDs) in improving test scores 4 and 8 weeks after these interventions in anesthesia residents during their first neuroanesthesia rotation. Design Prospective, nonblinded quasi-crossover study. Setting Cleveland Clinic. Patients Anesthesiology residents. Interventions Two case scenarios were delivered from the Anesoft software as screen-based sessions, and parallel scripts were developed for 2 PBLDs. Each resident underwent both types of training sessions, starting with the PBLD session, and the 2 cases were alternated each month (ie, in 1 month, the screen-based intervention used case 1 and the PBLD used case 2, and vice versa for the next month). Measurements Test scores before the rotation (baseline), immediately after the rotation (4 weeks after the start of the rotation), and 8 weeks after the start of rotation were collected on each topic from each resident. The effect of training method on improvement in test scores was assessed using a linear mixed-effects model. Main Results Compared to the departmental standard of PBLD, the simulation method did not improve either the 4- or 8-week mean test scores (P =.41 and P =.40 for training method effect on 4- and 8-week scores, respectively). Resident satisfaction with the simulation module on a 5-point Likert scale showed subjective evidence of a positive impact on resident education. Conclusions Screen-based simulators were not more effective than PBLD for education during the neuroanesthesia rotation in anesthesia residency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-11
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Anesthesia
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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Problem-Based Learning
Cross-Over Studies
Cohort Studies
Anesthesia
Education
Anesthesiology
Internship and Residency
Simulation Training
Teaching
Software
Learning

Keywords

  • Anesthesia
  • Computer simulation
  • Education
  • Neuroanesthesia
  • Problem-based learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Comparison of 2 resident learning tools - Interactive screen-based simulated case scenarios versus problem-based learning discussions : A prospective quasi-crossover cohort study. / Rajan, Shobana; Khanna, Ashish; Argalious, Maged; Kimatian, Stephen J.; Mascha, Edward J.; Makarova, Natalya; Nada, Eman M.; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Firoozbakhsh, Farhad; Avitsian, Rafi.

In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, Vol. 28, 01.02.2016, p. 4-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rajan, Shobana ; Khanna, Ashish ; Argalious, Maged ; Kimatian, Stephen J. ; Mascha, Edward J. ; Makarova, Natalya ; Nada, Eman M. ; Elsharkawy, Hesham ; Firoozbakhsh, Farhad ; Avitsian, Rafi. / Comparison of 2 resident learning tools - Interactive screen-based simulated case scenarios versus problem-based learning discussions : A prospective quasi-crossover cohort study. In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia. 2016 ; Vol. 28. pp. 4-11.
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