Comparison of self-directed learning versus instructor-modeled learning during a simulated clinical experience

Judy L. LeFlore, Mindi Anderson, Jacqueline L. Michael, William D. Engle, JoDee Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There are no reports in the literature that compare instructor-modeled learning to self-directed learning when simulation is used. Therefore, no evidence exists to know which approach is superior. This study aims to test the hypothesis that instructor-modeled learning is more effective compared with self-directed learning during a simulated clinical experience. METHODS: This is a descriptive pilot study to compare instructor-modeled learning with self-directed learning during a clinical simulated experience. Four evaluation tools were used at three time points to evaluate knowledge, self-efficacy (self confidence), and behaviors. RESULTS: Sixteen students participated. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups on the Knowledge Assessment Test. There were significant differences between the groups in the Self-Efficacy Tool (SET) at three times (time 1: P = 0.006, time 2: P = 0.008, time 3: P = 0.012). The only significance between the groups on the Technical Evaluation Tool was time to start Albuterol. The Behavioral Assessment Tool (BAT) showed significant differences between the groups in 8 out of 10 components of the tool. A strong correlation was observed between the overall score of the BAT and the SET Score. CONCLUSION: Although the small sample size prohibits definitive conclusions, the data suggest that instructor-modeled learning may be more effective than self-directed learning for some aspects of learning during a clinical simulated experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-177
Number of pages8
JournalSimulation in Healthcare
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

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instructor
Learning
learning
Self-efficacy
experience
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Group
Experience
Ego
Albuterol
self-confidence
Small Sample Size
Evaluation
evaluation
Sample Size
Students
Confidence
time
simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Epidemiology
  • Education
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Comparison of self-directed learning versus instructor-modeled learning during a simulated clinical experience. / LeFlore, Judy L.; Anderson, Mindi; Michael, Jacqueline L.; Engle, William D.; Anderson, JoDee.

In: Simulation in Healthcare, Vol. 2, No. 3, 09.2007, p. 170-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

LeFlore, Judy L. ; Anderson, Mindi ; Michael, Jacqueline L. ; Engle, William D. ; Anderson, JoDee. / Comparison of self-directed learning versus instructor-modeled learning during a simulated clinical experience. In: Simulation in Healthcare. 2007 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 170-177.
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