Comparison of the BOLD- and EPISTAR-technique for functional brain imaging by using signal detection theory

Bettina Siewert, Benjamin Martin Bly, Gottfried Schlaug, David G. Darby, Venkatesan Thangaraj, Steven Warach, Robert R. Edelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two magnetic resonance imaging techniques, BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent) and EPISTAR (echo-planar imaging and signal targeting with alternating radio-frequency), were compared for functional brain imaging. Ten volunteers were imaged performing a sequential finger to thumb opposition task alternating with no movement conditions. Techniques were compared using variance maps and signal detection theory (ROC analysis). True positive activation in regions of interest with expected task-dependent signal changes were computed versus false activation rates in regions in which no activation was expected. D-prime coefficients were calculated for each comparison and statistically compared using a paired t test. Activation in the perirolandic region was seen in all volunteers with both techniques. There was no significant difference for the d-prime between BOLD and EPISTAR. These results indicate that based on a different physiologic principle, EPISTAR is an alternative to BOLD to perform fMRI with similar results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-255
Number of pages7
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1996

Keywords

  • BOLD
  • brain
  • echo-planar imaging
  • functional MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comparison of the BOLD- and EPISTAR-technique for functional brain imaging by using signal detection theory'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Siewert, B., Bly, B. M., Schlaug, G., Darby, D. G., Thangaraj, V., Warach, S., & Edelman, R. R. (1996). Comparison of the BOLD- and EPISTAR-technique for functional brain imaging by using signal detection theory. Magnetic resonance in medicine, 36(2), 249-255. https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.1910360212