Complete groin lymphadenectomy with preservation of the fascia lata in the treatment of vulvar carcinoma

Jeffrey G. Bell, Jayanthi S. Lea, Gary C. Reid

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58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. The goal of this study was to assess the local groin recurrence of vulvar carcinoma in patients treated by complete groin node dissection with preservation of the fascia lata (GNDPFL). Methods. This study is a retrospective chart review of 60 patients with Stage I-IV vulvar carcinoma who underwent radical vulvectomy and GNDPFL between 1990 and 1998. All superficial inguinal nodes and the deep femoral nodes on the anterior and medial surfaces of the femoral vein within the fossa ovalis were removed en bloc while sparing the fascia lata and the cribriform fascia over the femoral artery. Results. Of the 60 study patients, 14 patients had Stage I disease, 20 Stage II, 21 Stage III, and 5 Stage IV. The mean number of nodes removed was 10 per groin. Thirty-nine patients had benign nodes on groin dissection. None of these 39 patients developed cancer recurrence in the dissected groins. Twenty-one of the sixty study patients (34%) had malignant nodes on groin dissection. Of these 21 patients, 2 experienced cancer recurrence in the groins. Our study describes a groin recurrence rate of 7.6% in patients with fewer than three malignant unilateral groin nodes. Postoperatively, 13% of patients developed lymphedema and 15% formed lymphoceles. Conclusions. The zero groin recurrence rate in patients with negative nodes and the low rate of recurrence in patients with positive nodes indicate that groin lymphadenectomy with preservation of fascia lata is complete, therapeutic, and comparable to radical techniques of lymphadenectomy involving skeletonization of femoral vessels, resection of fascia lata, and muscle transposition. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-318
Number of pages5
JournalGynecologic oncology
Volume77
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2000

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Keywords

  • Groin lymphadenectomy
  • Vulvar cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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