Complications of Charcot Reconstruction in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease

Nicole K. Cates, Tammer Elmarsafi, Cameron M. Akbari, Eshetu Tefera, Karen K. Evans, John S. Steinberg, Christopher E. Attinger, Paul J. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The primary aim was to determine the rate of complications in patients with peripheral arterial disease and diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy who underwent osseous reconstruction. Complications included delayed healing, dehiscence, and major lower extremity amputation. A review of patients with Charcot neuroarthropathy requiring reconstruction secondary to ulceration or acute infection was performed. Descriptive analysis compared outcomes between those with and without peripheral arterial disease. Bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were analyzed for delayed healing, dehiscence, and major amputation. In a cohort of 284 patients with diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy who underwent osseous reconstruction, the rate of peripheral arterial disease was 20.8% (59/284). Bivariate analysis for delayed healing found hypertension (p = .0352), peripheral arterial disease (p = .0051), and smoking history (p = .0276) to be statistically significant factors. Delayed healing was 2.012 times more likely in the presence of peripheral arterial disease [OR 2.012 (95% CI 1.088-3.720)]. Bivariate analysis for major lower extremity amputation found renal disease (0.0003) (renal disease: ESRD and CKD) and peripheral arterial disease (0.0001) to be statistically significant factors. Major amputation was 4.414 times more likely in the presence of peripheral arterial disease [OR 4.414 (95% CI 2.087-9.334)]. Peripheral arterial disease was identified in 20.8% (59/284) of diabetic patients who underwent Charcot osseous reconstruction. Peripheral arterial disease increased the risk of delayed healing by 2.012 fold, and increased the risk of major lower extremity amputation by 4.414 fold. The rates of complications in patients with peripheral arterial disease were significantly higher than those without peripheral arterial disease who underwent osseous reconstruction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)941-945
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Foot and Ankle Surgery
Volume60
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 3
  • Charcot neuroarthropathy
  • major lower extremity amputation
  • osseous reconstruction
  • outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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