Concomitant administration of interleukin-2 plus tumor necrosis factor in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

J. H. Schiller, C. Morgan-Ihrig, M. L. Levitt

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Abstract

Based upon in vitro and clinical data suggesting antitumor activity of interleukin-2 (IL-2) plus tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we conducted two parallel pilot studies of the combination in patients with advanced disease. Eight patients at the University of Wisconsin received 6 x 106 international U/m2/day of IL-2 by continuous infusion on days 1-4, 8-11, and 15-18 with 50 μg/m2/day of INF administered intramuscularly on the same days. Seven patients at the University of Pittsburgh received IL-2 as a continuous infusion for 5 days at a dose of 6 x 106 U/m2/day, every 14 days. TNF was administered intramuscularly on days 1 through 5, starting at a dose of 50 μg/m2. Patients with no evidence of grade 3 or 4 toxicity on the first cycle had their dose of TNF escalated from 50 to 100 and then to 150 μg/m2. No responses were observed. The therapy was not well tolerated, with 11 of 15 patients developing grade 3 or 4 toxicity at some point during their therapy. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities were pulmonary (6 episodes) or cardiac (4 episodes) events. Constitutional symptoms were common, but not dose-limiting. Despite the lack of observed responses, the median survival was 11 months, with one patient with metastatic disease alive over 30 months later. We conclude that IL-2 plus TNF was not effective in inducing responses in patients with advanced NSCLC, but the prolonged survival suggests a role for IL-2 in NSCLC, which needs to be further defined by means other than classic response criteria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-51
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
Volume18
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1995

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Interleukin-2
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Survival
Lung
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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Concomitant administration of interleukin-2 plus tumor necrosis factor in advanced non-small cell lung cancer. / Schiller, J. H.; Morgan-Ihrig, C.; Levitt, M. L.

In: American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials, Vol. 18, No. 1, 1995, p. 47-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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