Conditional ablation of the Mat1 subunit of TFIIH in Schwann cells provides evidence that Mat1 is not required for general transcription

Nina Korsisaari, Derrick J. Rossi, Anders Paetau, Patrick Charnay, Mark Henkemeyer, Tomi P. Mäkelä

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mammalian Mat1 protein has been implicated in cell cycle regulation as part of the Cdk activating kinase (CAK), and in regulation of transcription as a subunit of transcription factor TFIIH. To address the role of Mat1 in vivo, we have used a Cre/loxP system to conditionally ablate Mat1 in adult mitotic and post-mitotic lineages. We found that the mitotic cells of the germ lineage died rapidly upon disruption of Mat1 indicating an absolute requirement of Mat1 in these cells. By contrast, post-mitotic myelinating Schwann cells were able to attain a mature myelinated phenotype in the absence of Mat1. Moreover, mutant animals did not show morphological or physiological signs of Schwann cell dysfunction into early adulthood. Beyond 3 months of age, however, myelinated Schwann cells in the sciatic nerves acquired a severe hypomyelinating morphology with alterations ranging from cells undergoing degeneration to completely denuded axons. This phenotype was coupled to extensive proliferation and remyelination that our evidence suggests was undertaken by the non-myelinated Schwann cell pool. These results indicate that Mat1 is not essential for the transcriptional program underlying the myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells and suggest that the function of Mat1 in RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription in these cells is regulatory rather than essential.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4275-4284
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cell Science
Volume115
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2002

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Schwann Cells
Axons
Transcription Factor TFIIH
Phenotype
RNA Polymerase II
Cell Lineage
Sciatic Nerve
Cell Cycle
Proteins

Keywords

  • Krox-20
  • Mouse
  • Non-myelinated
  • RNA polymerase II
  • Testis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Conditional ablation of the Mat1 subunit of TFIIH in Schwann cells provides evidence that Mat1 is not required for general transcription. / Korsisaari, Nina; Rossi, Derrick J.; Paetau, Anders; Charnay, Patrick; Henkemeyer, Mark; Mäkelä, Tomi P.

In: Journal of Cell Science, Vol. 115, No. 22, 15.11.2002, p. 4275-4284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Korsisaari, Nina ; Rossi, Derrick J. ; Paetau, Anders ; Charnay, Patrick ; Henkemeyer, Mark ; Mäkelä, Tomi P. / Conditional ablation of the Mat1 subunit of TFIIH in Schwann cells provides evidence that Mat1 is not required for general transcription. In: Journal of Cell Science. 2002 ; Vol. 115, No. 22. pp. 4275-4284.
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