Congenital band syndrome with pseudarthrosis of the radius and ulna and impending vascular compromise: A case report

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Although amniotic band syndrome is relatively rare, reports of pseudarthrosis in conjunction with amniotic band syndrome are even rarer, as are reports of impending vascular compromise in the neonatal period. Careful serial examinations and timely surgical intervention can successfully avoid the catastrophic event of limb loss. We report on a case of upper extremity amniotic band syndrome with pseudarthrosis of the radius and ulna that was complicated by vascular compromise in a neonate. METHODS:: Chart and radiographic data for this single case were reviewed and reported retrospectively. RESULTS:: A 1-day-old neonate born at 28 3/7 weeks of gestational age was transferred to our institution for increased swelling to the forearm distal to a congenital band associated with an underlying radius and ulna pseudarthrosis. Although the forearm and hand were soft and viable initially, severe edema and swelling occurred after fluid resuscitation, and on the fourth day of life, the patient underwent simple band releases at bedside with 2 longitudinal incisions over the radius and ulna. Circulation was restored, and the pseudarthrosis healed with no further surgical intervention. Successful delayed reconstruction of the band with Z-plasties was performed when the baby was 7 months of age. CONCLUSIONS:: In this case, a relatively simple, straightforward procedure that is familiar to most pediatric orthopaedists salvaged a compromised neonatal limb with amniotic band syndrome and allowed healing of a pseudarthrosis, allowing more complex reconstruction to be performed in a delayed, elective manner. Careful observation is necessary in the neonatal period of the baby with a severe band; a viable, well-perfused, compressible extremity may still be at risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e14-e18
JournalJournal of Pediatric Orthopaedics
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2014

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Keywords

  • amniotic band syndrome
  • pseudarthrosis
  • vascular compromise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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