Congenital corrected transposition with atrial inversion and normal hemodynamics

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The first reported case of corrected transposition with atrial inversion and normal hemodynamics is presented. The patient is an asymptomatic 10-year-old boy with a loud single second heart sound and a soft systolic ejection murmur at the base. The electrocardiogram reveals a P-wave vector directed to the right and inferiorly, suggesting atrial inversion. The presence of q waves in V4-6 suggests noninverted ventricles. Chest roentgenograms show dextrocardia, situs inversus, and a right aortic arch. Cardiac catheterization hemodynamic data reveal no evidence of a shunt or significant valvar abnormalities. On angiography the aortic valve lies to the right of the pulmonic valve and is more cephalad indicating D-transposition of the great arteries. The circulation is functionally completely corrected, since the systemic venous drainage enters the left-sided atrium and is ejected into the pulmonary artery by the left ventricle. The pulmonary venous drainage enters the right-sided atrium and is ejected into the transposed aorta by the right ventricle. A systematic approach to chamber localization is reviewed based upon: (1) the relationship of the viscera and atria (visceral atrial situs); (2) the relationship of the ventricles (type of bulboventricular loop); (3) the relationship of the great arteries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-391
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume81
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1971

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Systolic Murmurs
Heart Atria
Heart Ventricles
Drainage
Hemodynamics
Dextrocardia
Situs Inversus
Heart Sounds
Lung
Transposition of Great Vessels
Viscera
Cardiac Catheterization
Thoracic Aorta
Aortic Valve
Pulmonary Artery
Aorta
Angiography
Electrocardiography
Thorax
Arteries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Congenital corrected transposition with atrial inversion and normal hemodynamics. / Fixler, David E.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 81, No. 3, 1971, p. 387-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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