Construction of a hybrid β-hexosaminidase subunit capable of forming stable homodimers that hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside in vivo

Michael B. Tropak, Sayuri Yonekawa, Subha Karumuthil-Melethil, Patrick Thompson, Warren Wakarchuk, Steven J. Gray, Jagdeep S. Walia, Brian L. Mark, Don Mahuran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff disease result from mutations in either the evolutionarily related HEXA or HEXB genes encoding respectively, the α- or β-subunits of β-hexosaminidase A (HexA). Of the three Hex isozymes, only HexA can interact with its cofactor, the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP), and hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. A major impediment to establishing gene or enzyme replacement therapy based on HexA is the need to synthesize both subunits. Thus, we combined the critical features of both α- and β-subunits into a single hybrid µ-subunit that contains the α-subunit active site, the stable β-subunit interface and unique areas in each subunit needed to interact with GM2AP. To facilitate intracellular analysis and the purification of the µ-homodimer (HexM), CRISPR-based genome editing was used to disrupt the HEXA and HEXB genes in a Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cell line stably expressing the µ-subunit. In association with GM2AP, HexM was shown to hydrolyze a fluorescent GM2 ganglioside derivative both in cellulo and in vitro. Gene transfer studies in both Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff mouse models demonstrated that HexM expression reduced brain GM2 ganglioside levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15057
Number of pages1
JournalMolecular Therapy - Methods and Clinical Development
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 16 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Construction of a hybrid β-hexosaminidase subunit capable of forming stable homodimers that hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside in vivo'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this