Contact lens care solutions downregulate membrane-associated mucins 1 and 16 in cultured human corneal epithelial cells and at the rat corneal surface in Vivo

Kissaou Tchedre, Masaki Imayasu, Yuichi Hori, Harrison D Cavanagh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was first to evaluate the effect of multipurpose contact lens care solutions (MPSs) on the expression of membrane-associated mucins (MUC1 and MUC16) in SV40-transformed human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells and in vivo rat cornea. The second aim of this study was to determine the role of the common MPS additive boric acid in reducing mucin expression and release. Methods: The HCE-T cells were exposed to different concentrations of MPS-F, MPS-G, MPS-H, MPS-I, and MPS-J with 100% treatment for 30 minutes and 10% treatment for 24 hours. MUC1 and MUC16 expressions were subsequently analyzed by Western blotting. Wister rats were also subjected to MPS-A, MPS-B, MPS-C, MPS-D, and MPS-E and received phosphate-buffered saline exposure (1 drop in the right eye every 10 minutes for 1 hour). The left eye was used as control. Cornea sections and lysates were used for the immunohistochemical assay of MUC1 and MUC16 expressions. Conditioned media from treated HCE-T cells were also analyzed using Western blotting. Results: The MPSs containing boric acid downregulated MUC1 and MUC16 in the rat cornea, whereas MPSs without boric acid had no effect as demonstrated by the Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. Conditioned media from MPS-containing boric acid revealed some trace of MUC16. Conclusions: The clinical use of MPSs containing boric acid that reduce MUC1 and MUC16 availability should be avoided. Additionally, the presence of MUC16 in the conditioned media suggests that boric acid may have enhanced cleavage of MUC16 at the cell membrane surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-399
Number of pages6
JournalEye and Contact Lens
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

Contact Lens Solutions
CA-125 Antigen
Mucin-1
Down-Regulation
Epithelial Cells
Membranes
Conditioned Culture Medium
Cornea
Western Blotting
Mucins
boric acid
Phosphates
Cell Membrane

Keywords

  • Boric acid
  • Care solution-Mucin
  • Corneal epithelial cell-Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Contact lens care solutions downregulate membrane-associated mucins 1 and 16 in cultured human corneal epithelial cells and at the rat corneal surface in Vivo. / Tchedre, Kissaou; Imayasu, Masaki; Hori, Yuichi; Cavanagh, Harrison D.

In: Eye and Contact Lens, Vol. 39, No. 6, 11.2013, p. 394-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: The purpose of this study was first to evaluate the effect of multipurpose contact lens care solutions (MPSs) on the expression of membrane-associated mucins (MUC1 and MUC16) in SV40-transformed human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells and in vivo rat cornea. The second aim of this study was to determine the role of the common MPS additive boric acid in reducing mucin expression and release. Methods: The HCE-T cells were exposed to different concentrations of MPS-F, MPS-G, MPS-H, MPS-I, and MPS-J with 100{\%} treatment for 30 minutes and 10{\%} treatment for 24 hours. MUC1 and MUC16 expressions were subsequently analyzed by Western blotting. Wister rats were also subjected to MPS-A, MPS-B, MPS-C, MPS-D, and MPS-E and received phosphate-buffered saline exposure (1 drop in the right eye every 10 minutes for 1 hour). The left eye was used as control. Cornea sections and lysates were used for the immunohistochemical assay of MUC1 and MUC16 expressions. Conditioned media from treated HCE-T cells were also analyzed using Western blotting. Results: The MPSs containing boric acid downregulated MUC1 and MUC16 in the rat cornea, whereas MPSs without boric acid had no effect as demonstrated by the Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. Conditioned media from MPS-containing boric acid revealed some trace of MUC16. Conclusions: The clinical use of MPSs containing boric acid that reduce MUC1 and MUC16 availability should be avoided. Additionally, the presence of MUC16 in the conditioned media suggests that boric acid may have enhanced cleavage of MUC16 at the cell membrane surface.",
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AU - Hori, Yuichi

AU - Cavanagh, Harrison D

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AB - Objective: The purpose of this study was first to evaluate the effect of multipurpose contact lens care solutions (MPSs) on the expression of membrane-associated mucins (MUC1 and MUC16) in SV40-transformed human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells and in vivo rat cornea. The second aim of this study was to determine the role of the common MPS additive boric acid in reducing mucin expression and release. Methods: The HCE-T cells were exposed to different concentrations of MPS-F, MPS-G, MPS-H, MPS-I, and MPS-J with 100% treatment for 30 minutes and 10% treatment for 24 hours. MUC1 and MUC16 expressions were subsequently analyzed by Western blotting. Wister rats were also subjected to MPS-A, MPS-B, MPS-C, MPS-D, and MPS-E and received phosphate-buffered saline exposure (1 drop in the right eye every 10 minutes for 1 hour). The left eye was used as control. Cornea sections and lysates were used for the immunohistochemical assay of MUC1 and MUC16 expressions. Conditioned media from treated HCE-T cells were also analyzed using Western blotting. Results: The MPSs containing boric acid downregulated MUC1 and MUC16 in the rat cornea, whereas MPSs without boric acid had no effect as demonstrated by the Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. Conditioned media from MPS-containing boric acid revealed some trace of MUC16. Conclusions: The clinical use of MPSs containing boric acid that reduce MUC1 and MUC16 availability should be avoided. Additionally, the presence of MUC16 in the conditioned media suggests that boric acid may have enhanced cleavage of MUC16 at the cell membrane surface.

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