Contemporary Management of Increased Intraoperative Intracranial Pressure: Evidence-Based Anesthetic and Surgical Review

Virendra R. Desai, Saeed S. Sadrameli, Szymon Hoppe, Jonathan J. Lee, Amanda Jenson, William J. Steele, Huong Nguyen, David L McDonagh, Gavin W. Britz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is frequently encountered in the neurosurgical setting. A multitude of tactics exists to reduce ICP, ranging from patient position and medications to cerebrospinal fluid diversion and surgical decompression. A vast amount of literature has been published regarding ICP management in the critical care setting, but studies specifically tailored toward the management of intraoperative acute increases in ICP or brain bulk are lacking. Compartmentalizing the intracranial space into blood, brain tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid and understanding the numerous techniques available to affect these individual compartments can guide the surgical team to quickly identify increased brain bulk and respond appropriately. Rapidly instituting measures for brain relaxation in the operating room is essential in optimizing patient outcomes. Knowledge of the efficacy, rapidity, feasibility, and risks of the various available interventions can aid the team to properly tailor their approach to each individual patient. In this article, we present the first evidence-based review of intraoperative management of ICP and brain bulk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-129
Number of pages10
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume129
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

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Intracranial Pressure
Anesthetics
Brain
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Surgical Decompression
Intracranial Hypertension
Operating Rooms
Critical Care

Keywords

  • Brain bulk
  • Brain edema
  • Brain swelling
  • Cerebral edema
  • Cerebral swelling
  • Intracranial pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Desai, V. R., Sadrameli, S. S., Hoppe, S., Lee, J. J., Jenson, A., Steele, W. J., ... Britz, G. W. (2019). Contemporary Management of Increased Intraoperative Intracranial Pressure: Evidence-Based Anesthetic and Surgical Review. World Neurosurgery, 129, 120-129. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2019.05.224

Contemporary Management of Increased Intraoperative Intracranial Pressure : Evidence-Based Anesthetic and Surgical Review. / Desai, Virendra R.; Sadrameli, Saeed S.; Hoppe, Szymon; Lee, Jonathan J.; Jenson, Amanda; Steele, William J.; Nguyen, Huong; McDonagh, David L; Britz, Gavin W.

In: World Neurosurgery, Vol. 129, 01.09.2019, p. 120-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Desai, Virendra R. ; Sadrameli, Saeed S. ; Hoppe, Szymon ; Lee, Jonathan J. ; Jenson, Amanda ; Steele, William J. ; Nguyen, Huong ; McDonagh, David L ; Britz, Gavin W. / Contemporary Management of Increased Intraoperative Intracranial Pressure : Evidence-Based Anesthetic and Surgical Review. In: World Neurosurgery. 2019 ; Vol. 129. pp. 120-129.
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