Continuation-Phase Cognitive Therapy's Effects on Remission and Recovery From Depression

Jeffrey R. Vittengl, Lee Anna Clark, Robin B. Jarrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors tested the effects of continuation-phase cognitive therapy (C-CT) on remission and recovery from recurrent major depressive disorder, defined as 6 weeks and 8 months, respectively, of continuously absent or minimal symptoms. Responders to acute-phase cognitive therapy were randomized to 8 months of C-CT (n = 41) or assessment control (n = 43), and they were followed 16 additional months (R. B. Jarrett et al., 2001). Relative to controls, a few more patients in C-CT remitted (88% vs. 97%), and significantly more recovered (62% vs. 84%). All patients without remission and recovery relapsed, but most patients who remitted (60%) and who recovered (75%) did not later relapse or recur. The authors discuss the importance of defining efficacious treatment as producing remission and recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-371
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume77
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

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Cognitive Therapy
Depression
Major Depressive Disorder
Recurrence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • cognitive therapy
  • continuation-phase cognitive therapy
  • major depressive disorder
  • recovery
  • remission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Continuation-Phase Cognitive Therapy's Effects on Remission and Recovery From Depression. / Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Jarrett, Robin B.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 77, No. 2, 04.2009, p. 367-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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