Contribution of Breastfeeding to False-Positive Saliva Polymerase Chain Reaction for Newborn Congenital Cytomegalovirus Screening

Shannon A. Ross, Marian G. Michaels, Amina Ahmed, April L. Palmer, Pablo J. Sánchez, David I. Bernstein, Kristina Feja, Audra Stewart, Suresh B. Boppana, Karen B. Fowler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of saliva is highly sensitive for newborn congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) screening. This study uses nationally published CMV seroprevalence and breastfeeding rates to estimate the contribution of CMV DNA in breast milk to false-positive saliva PCR results. The false-positive rates adjusted for breastfeeding ranged from 0.03% in white Hispanic persons to 0.14% in white non-Hispanic persons. Saliva CMV PCR for newborn screening is highly sensitive, and the low false-positive rates in this study suggest that saliva PCR results are unlikely to be significantly influenced by breastfeeding or other perinatal exposures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1612-1615
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume217
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 23 2018

Keywords

  • breastfeeding
  • cytomegalovirus
  • newborn
  • polymerase chain reaction
  • saliva
  • screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Contribution of Breastfeeding to False-Positive Saliva Polymerase Chain Reaction for Newborn Congenital Cytomegalovirus Screening'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Ross, S. A., Michaels, M. G., Ahmed, A., Palmer, A. L., Sánchez, P. J., Bernstein, D. I., Feja, K., Stewart, A., Boppana, S. B., & Fowler, K. B. (2018). Contribution of Breastfeeding to False-Positive Saliva Polymerase Chain Reaction for Newborn Congenital Cytomegalovirus Screening. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 217(10), 1612-1615. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiy057