Conversion of lytic to persistent alphavirus infection by the bcl-2 cellular oncogene

Beth Levine, Qi Huang, John T. Isaacs, John C. Reed, Diane E. Grifin, J. Marie Hardwick

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Abstract

LITTLE is known about virus-host cell interactions that regulate the lytic potential of viruses during productive replication. Sindbis virus (SV), a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus in the alphavirus genus (family Togaviridae), results in lytic infection in most vertebrate cell lines, but persistent productive infection in post-mitotic neurons'. The cellular oncogene bcl-2, which encodes an inner mitochondrial membrane protein of Mr 26,000 (ref. 2), blocks programmed cell death (apoptosis) in neurons3. We there-fore investigated whether SV infection induces programmed cell death in non-neuronal cells, and if so, whether virus-induced programmed cell death can be blocked by transfection with bcl-2. We demonstrate that SV infection of baby hamster kidney (BHK-2), mouse neuroblastoma (N 18), and rat prostatic adenocarcinoma (AT-3) cells results in programmed cell death, whereas SV infection of bcl-2-transfected AT-3 cells results in long-term persistent productive infection. Thus cellular bcl-2 oncogene expression plays a role in the establishment of persistent viral infection by blocking virus-induced programmed cell death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)739-742
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume361
Issue number6414
StatePublished - Feb 25 1993

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Alphavirus Infections
Sindbis Virus
Oncogenes
Virus Diseases
Cell Death
Viruses
Togaviridae
Infection
Alphavirus
RNA Viruses
Mitochondrial Proteins
Mitochondrial Membranes
Neuroblastoma
Cell Communication
Cricetinae
Transfection
Vertebrates
Membrane Proteins
Adenocarcinoma
Apoptosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Levine, B., Huang, Q., Isaacs, J. T., Reed, J. C., Grifin, D. E., & Hardwick, J. M. (1993). Conversion of lytic to persistent alphavirus infection by the bcl-2 cellular oncogene. Nature, 361(6414), 739-742.

Conversion of lytic to persistent alphavirus infection by the bcl-2 cellular oncogene. / Levine, Beth; Huang, Qi; Isaacs, John T.; Reed, John C.; Grifin, Diane E.; Hardwick, J. Marie.

In: Nature, Vol. 361, No. 6414, 25.02.1993, p. 739-742.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levine, B, Huang, Q, Isaacs, JT, Reed, JC, Grifin, DE & Hardwick, JM 1993, 'Conversion of lytic to persistent alphavirus infection by the bcl-2 cellular oncogene', Nature, vol. 361, no. 6414, pp. 739-742.
Levine B, Huang Q, Isaacs JT, Reed JC, Grifin DE, Hardwick JM. Conversion of lytic to persistent alphavirus infection by the bcl-2 cellular oncogene. Nature. 1993 Feb 25;361(6414):739-742.
Levine, Beth ; Huang, Qi ; Isaacs, John T. ; Reed, John C. ; Grifin, Diane E. ; Hardwick, J. Marie. / Conversion of lytic to persistent alphavirus infection by the bcl-2 cellular oncogene. In: Nature. 1993 ; Vol. 361, No. 6414. pp. 739-742.
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