Coralline hydroxyapatite bone graft substitutes in a canine diaphyseal defect model: radiographic features of failed and successful union

David J. Sartoris, Ralph E. Holmes, Robert W. Bucholz, Donald Resnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Radiographic and densitometric evaluation of a new type of bone graft substitute derived from reef-building sea coral via a hydrothermal chemical exchange process was undertaken in a canine diaphyseal defect model. Comparably sized blocks of this material and autogenous iliac cortical-cancellous graft were implanted into the respective radial diaphyses of seven dogs. Qualitative and quantitative radiographic assessment was performed during the immediate postoperative period and at 3 months following surgery. Significant complications were observed radiographically in over half of the coralline implanted limbs, including failed union, graft fracture, and loosening of internal fixation hardware. No significant difference was noted in degree of native osseous ingrowth between the implants and the autografts, and the latter exhibited a higher success rate. Radiographic film densitometry was found not to be reliably predictive of coralline implant behavior in the individual case. It is concluded that coralline hydroxyapatite bone graft substitutes appear to offer no particular advantage over autogenous grafts in the management of diaphyseal defects, although further investigation is warranted since other factors may be responsible for the unfavorable findings in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-647
Number of pages6
JournalSkeletal radiology
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1986

Keywords

  • Bones, radiography
  • Bones, surgery
  • Fractures, therapy
  • Hydroxyapatite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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