Core temperature is not elevated at rest in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

Georgia K. Chaseling, Dustin R. Allen, Steve Vucic, Michael Barnett, Elliot Frohman, Scott L. Davis, Ollie Jay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To reassess the notion that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) do not demonstrate an elevated resting core temperature when measured using best-practice precision thermometry. Method: Across two international data collection sites (Australia and USA), twenty-eight relapsing-remitting MS patients and 27 aged-matched controls (CON) were exposed to either 30 °C, 30% relative humidity (RH) (Sydney) or 25 °C, 30% RH (Dallas). Resting rectal (Tre) and esophageal (Teso) temperature and resting oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured in MS (n = 28) and CON (n = 27) groups who completed the 25 °C and 30 °C trials. Tympanic membrane (Ttym) temperature was measured in MS (n = 16) and CON (n = 15) groups in the 30 °C condition. A modified fatigue impact scale (MFIS) questionnaire was used to assess subjective measures of psychosocial, physical and cognitive fatigue in the 30 °C condition. Results: Irrespective of ambient temperature, no group differences were observed for Tre (MS: 37.07 ± 0.30 °C; CON: 37.18 ± 0.30 °C; P = 0.29), Teso (MS: 36.84 ± 0.42 °C; CON: 36.92 ± 0.29 °C; P = 0.36) or resting VO2 (MS: 3.89 ± 0.18 ml⋅kg−1⋅min−1; CON: 3.98 ± 0.17 ml⋅kg−1⋅min−1; P = 0.67). Similarly, no group differences were observed for Ttym (MS: 36.52 ± 0.38 °C; CON: 36.61 ± 0.33 °C; P = 0.55) in the 30 °C condition. Resting Tre did not correlate with subjective measures of fatigue: physical: r = -0.11, P = 0.67; cognitive: r = -0.14, P = 0.60; and psychosocial: r = 0.05, P = 0.84. Conclusion: Contrary to recent reports, resting core temperature is not elevated in relapsing-remitting MS patients compared to healthy controls when measured using precision thermometry. Furthermore, no association was observed between resting Tre and any subjective measures of fatigue in a subset of participants with MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-67
Number of pages6
JournalMultiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders
Volume29
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple Sclerosis
Temperature
Fatigue
Thermometry
Humidity
Tympanic Membrane
Practice Guidelines
Oxygen Consumption

Keywords

  • Body temperature
  • Fatigue
  • Heat sensitivity
  • Uhthoff's phenomenon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Core temperature is not elevated at rest in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. / Chaseling, Georgia K.; Allen, Dustin R.; Vucic, Steve; Barnett, Michael; Frohman, Elliot; Davis, Scott L.; Jay, Ollie.

In: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, Vol. 29, 01.04.2019, p. 62-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chaseling, Georgia K. ; Allen, Dustin R. ; Vucic, Steve ; Barnett, Michael ; Frohman, Elliot ; Davis, Scott L. ; Jay, Ollie. / Core temperature is not elevated at rest in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. In: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 29. pp. 62-67.
@article{9fee9d203e0c41129d9eff30aac44504,
title = "Core temperature is not elevated at rest in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis",
abstract = "Purpose: To reassess the notion that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) do not demonstrate an elevated resting core temperature when measured using best-practice precision thermometry. Method: Across two international data collection sites (Australia and USA), twenty-eight relapsing-remitting MS patients and 27 aged-matched controls (CON) were exposed to either 30 °C, 30{\%} relative humidity (RH) (Sydney) or 25 °C, 30{\%} RH (Dallas). Resting rectal (Tre) and esophageal (Teso) temperature and resting oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured in MS (n = 28) and CON (n = 27) groups who completed the 25 °C and 30 °C trials. Tympanic membrane (Ttym) temperature was measured in MS (n = 16) and CON (n = 15) groups in the 30 °C condition. A modified fatigue impact scale (MFIS) questionnaire was used to assess subjective measures of psychosocial, physical and cognitive fatigue in the 30 °C condition. Results: Irrespective of ambient temperature, no group differences were observed for Tre (MS: 37.07 ± 0.30 °C; CON: 37.18 ± 0.30 °C; P = 0.29), Teso (MS: 36.84 ± 0.42 °C; CON: 36.92 ± 0.29 °C; P = 0.36) or resting VO2 (MS: 3.89 ± 0.18 ml⋅kg−1⋅min−1; CON: 3.98 ± 0.17 ml⋅kg−1⋅min−1; P = 0.67). Similarly, no group differences were observed for Ttym (MS: 36.52 ± 0.38 °C; CON: 36.61 ± 0.33 °C; P = 0.55) in the 30 °C condition. Resting Tre did not correlate with subjective measures of fatigue: physical: r = -0.11, P = 0.67; cognitive: r = -0.14, P = 0.60; and psychosocial: r = 0.05, P = 0.84. Conclusion: Contrary to recent reports, resting core temperature is not elevated in relapsing-remitting MS patients compared to healthy controls when measured using precision thermometry. Furthermore, no association was observed between resting Tre and any subjective measures of fatigue in a subset of participants with MS.",
keywords = "Body temperature, Fatigue, Heat sensitivity, Uhthoff's phenomenon",
author = "Chaseling, {Georgia K.} and Allen, {Dustin R.} and Steve Vucic and Michael Barnett and Elliot Frohman and Davis, {Scott L.} and Ollie Jay",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.msard.2019.01.013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "62--67",
journal = "Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders",
issn = "2211-0348",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Core temperature is not elevated at rest in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

AU - Chaseling, Georgia K.

AU - Allen, Dustin R.

AU - Vucic, Steve

AU - Barnett, Michael

AU - Frohman, Elliot

AU - Davis, Scott L.

AU - Jay, Ollie

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Purpose: To reassess the notion that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) do not demonstrate an elevated resting core temperature when measured using best-practice precision thermometry. Method: Across two international data collection sites (Australia and USA), twenty-eight relapsing-remitting MS patients and 27 aged-matched controls (CON) were exposed to either 30 °C, 30% relative humidity (RH) (Sydney) or 25 °C, 30% RH (Dallas). Resting rectal (Tre) and esophageal (Teso) temperature and resting oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured in MS (n = 28) and CON (n = 27) groups who completed the 25 °C and 30 °C trials. Tympanic membrane (Ttym) temperature was measured in MS (n = 16) and CON (n = 15) groups in the 30 °C condition. A modified fatigue impact scale (MFIS) questionnaire was used to assess subjective measures of psychosocial, physical and cognitive fatigue in the 30 °C condition. Results: Irrespective of ambient temperature, no group differences were observed for Tre (MS: 37.07 ± 0.30 °C; CON: 37.18 ± 0.30 °C; P = 0.29), Teso (MS: 36.84 ± 0.42 °C; CON: 36.92 ± 0.29 °C; P = 0.36) or resting VO2 (MS: 3.89 ± 0.18 ml⋅kg−1⋅min−1; CON: 3.98 ± 0.17 ml⋅kg−1⋅min−1; P = 0.67). Similarly, no group differences were observed for Ttym (MS: 36.52 ± 0.38 °C; CON: 36.61 ± 0.33 °C; P = 0.55) in the 30 °C condition. Resting Tre did not correlate with subjective measures of fatigue: physical: r = -0.11, P = 0.67; cognitive: r = -0.14, P = 0.60; and psychosocial: r = 0.05, P = 0.84. Conclusion: Contrary to recent reports, resting core temperature is not elevated in relapsing-remitting MS patients compared to healthy controls when measured using precision thermometry. Furthermore, no association was observed between resting Tre and any subjective measures of fatigue in a subset of participants with MS.

AB - Purpose: To reassess the notion that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) do not demonstrate an elevated resting core temperature when measured using best-practice precision thermometry. Method: Across two international data collection sites (Australia and USA), twenty-eight relapsing-remitting MS patients and 27 aged-matched controls (CON) were exposed to either 30 °C, 30% relative humidity (RH) (Sydney) or 25 °C, 30% RH (Dallas). Resting rectal (Tre) and esophageal (Teso) temperature and resting oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured in MS (n = 28) and CON (n = 27) groups who completed the 25 °C and 30 °C trials. Tympanic membrane (Ttym) temperature was measured in MS (n = 16) and CON (n = 15) groups in the 30 °C condition. A modified fatigue impact scale (MFIS) questionnaire was used to assess subjective measures of psychosocial, physical and cognitive fatigue in the 30 °C condition. Results: Irrespective of ambient temperature, no group differences were observed for Tre (MS: 37.07 ± 0.30 °C; CON: 37.18 ± 0.30 °C; P = 0.29), Teso (MS: 36.84 ± 0.42 °C; CON: 36.92 ± 0.29 °C; P = 0.36) or resting VO2 (MS: 3.89 ± 0.18 ml⋅kg−1⋅min−1; CON: 3.98 ± 0.17 ml⋅kg−1⋅min−1; P = 0.67). Similarly, no group differences were observed for Ttym (MS: 36.52 ± 0.38 °C; CON: 36.61 ± 0.33 °C; P = 0.55) in the 30 °C condition. Resting Tre did not correlate with subjective measures of fatigue: physical: r = -0.11, P = 0.67; cognitive: r = -0.14, P = 0.60; and psychosocial: r = 0.05, P = 0.84. Conclusion: Contrary to recent reports, resting core temperature is not elevated in relapsing-remitting MS patients compared to healthy controls when measured using precision thermometry. Furthermore, no association was observed between resting Tre and any subjective measures of fatigue in a subset of participants with MS.

KW - Body temperature

KW - Fatigue

KW - Heat sensitivity

KW - Uhthoff's phenomenon

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060354499&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85060354499&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.msard.2019.01.013

DO - 10.1016/j.msard.2019.01.013

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 62

EP - 67

JO - Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders

JF - Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders

SN - 2211-0348

ER -