Correlations between brain structure and symptom dimensions of psychosis in schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and psychotic bipolar i disorders

Jaya L. Padmanabhan, Neeraj Tandon, Chiara S. Haller, Ian T. Mathew, Shaun M. Eack, Brett A. Clementz, Godfrey D. Pearlson, John A. Sweeney, Carol A. Tamminga, Matcheri S. Keshavan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Structural alterations may correlate with symptom severity in psychotic disorders, but the existing literature on this issue is heterogeneous. In addition, it is not known how cortical thickness and cortical surface area correlate with symptom dimensions of psychosis. Methods: Subjects included 455 individuals with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or bipolar I disorders. Data were obtained as part of the Bipolar Schizophrenia Network for Intermediate Phenotypes study. Diagnosis was made through the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Positive and negative symptom subscales were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Structural brain measurements were extracted from T1-weight structural MRIs using FreeSurfer v5.1 and were correlated with symptom subscales using partial correlations. Exploratory factor analysis was also used to identify factors among those regions correlating with symptom subscales. Results: The positive symptom subscale correlated inversely with gray matter volume (GMV) and cortical thickness in frontal and temporal regions, whereas the negative symptom subscale correlated inversely with right frontal cortical surface area. Among regions correlating with the positive subscale, factor analysis identified four factors, including a temporal cortical thickness factor and frontal GMV factor. Among regions correlating with the negative subscale, factor analysis identified a frontal GMV-cortical surface area factor. There was no significant diagnosis by structure interactions with symptom severity. Conclusions: Structural measures correlate with positive and negative symptom severity in psychotic disorders. Cortical thickness demonstrated more associations with psychopathology than cortical surface area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-162
Number of pages9
JournalSchizophrenia Bulletin
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Bipolar Disorder
Psychotic Disorders
Statistical Factor Analysis
Schizophrenia
Brain
Temporal Lobe
Psychopathology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Interviews
Phenotype
Weights and Measures
Gray Matter

Keywords

  • cortical thickness
  • gray matter
  • negative
  • positive
  • psychopathology
  • surface area

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Padmanabhan, J. L., Tandon, N., Haller, C. S., Mathew, I. T., Eack, S. M., Clementz, B. A., ... Keshavan, M. S. (2015). Correlations between brain structure and symptom dimensions of psychosis in schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and psychotic bipolar i disorders. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 41(1), 154-162. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbu075

Correlations between brain structure and symptom dimensions of psychosis in schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and psychotic bipolar i disorders. / Padmanabhan, Jaya L.; Tandon, Neeraj; Haller, Chiara S.; Mathew, Ian T.; Eack, Shaun M.; Clementz, Brett A.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Sweeney, John A.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 154-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Padmanabhan, Jaya L. ; Tandon, Neeraj ; Haller, Chiara S. ; Mathew, Ian T. ; Eack, Shaun M. ; Clementz, Brett A. ; Pearlson, Godfrey D. ; Sweeney, John A. ; Tamminga, Carol A. ; Keshavan, Matcheri S. / Correlations between brain structure and symptom dimensions of psychosis in schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and psychotic bipolar i disorders. In: Schizophrenia Bulletin. 2015 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 154-162.
@article{21264d4a347c443392e34531a089dd55,
title = "Correlations between brain structure and symptom dimensions of psychosis in schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and psychotic bipolar i disorders",
abstract = "Introduction: Structural alterations may correlate with symptom severity in psychotic disorders, but the existing literature on this issue is heterogeneous. In addition, it is not known how cortical thickness and cortical surface area correlate with symptom dimensions of psychosis. Methods: Subjects included 455 individuals with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or bipolar I disorders. Data were obtained as part of the Bipolar Schizophrenia Network for Intermediate Phenotypes study. Diagnosis was made through the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Positive and negative symptom subscales were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Structural brain measurements were extracted from T1-weight structural MRIs using FreeSurfer v5.1 and were correlated with symptom subscales using partial correlations. Exploratory factor analysis was also used to identify factors among those regions correlating with symptom subscales. Results: The positive symptom subscale correlated inversely with gray matter volume (GMV) and cortical thickness in frontal and temporal regions, whereas the negative symptom subscale correlated inversely with right frontal cortical surface area. Among regions correlating with the positive subscale, factor analysis identified four factors, including a temporal cortical thickness factor and frontal GMV factor. Among regions correlating with the negative subscale, factor analysis identified a frontal GMV-cortical surface area factor. There was no significant diagnosis by structure interactions with symptom severity. Conclusions: Structural measures correlate with positive and negative symptom severity in psychotic disorders. Cortical thickness demonstrated more associations with psychopathology than cortical surface area.",
keywords = "cortical thickness, gray matter, negative, positive, psychopathology, surface area",
author = "Padmanabhan, {Jaya L.} and Neeraj Tandon and Haller, {Chiara S.} and Mathew, {Ian T.} and Eack, {Shaun M.} and Clementz, {Brett A.} and Pearlson, {Godfrey D.} and Sweeney, {John A.} and Tamminga, {Carol A.} and Keshavan, {Matcheri S.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/schbul/sbu075",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "154--162",
journal = "Schizophrenia Bulletin",
issn = "0586-7614",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlations between brain structure and symptom dimensions of psychosis in schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and psychotic bipolar i disorders

AU - Padmanabhan, Jaya L.

AU - Tandon, Neeraj

AU - Haller, Chiara S.

AU - Mathew, Ian T.

AU - Eack, Shaun M.

AU - Clementz, Brett A.

AU - Pearlson, Godfrey D.

AU - Sweeney, John A.

AU - Tamminga, Carol A.

AU - Keshavan, Matcheri S.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Introduction: Structural alterations may correlate with symptom severity in psychotic disorders, but the existing literature on this issue is heterogeneous. In addition, it is not known how cortical thickness and cortical surface area correlate with symptom dimensions of psychosis. Methods: Subjects included 455 individuals with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or bipolar I disorders. Data were obtained as part of the Bipolar Schizophrenia Network for Intermediate Phenotypes study. Diagnosis was made through the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Positive and negative symptom subscales were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Structural brain measurements were extracted from T1-weight structural MRIs using FreeSurfer v5.1 and were correlated with symptom subscales using partial correlations. Exploratory factor analysis was also used to identify factors among those regions correlating with symptom subscales. Results: The positive symptom subscale correlated inversely with gray matter volume (GMV) and cortical thickness in frontal and temporal regions, whereas the negative symptom subscale correlated inversely with right frontal cortical surface area. Among regions correlating with the positive subscale, factor analysis identified four factors, including a temporal cortical thickness factor and frontal GMV factor. Among regions correlating with the negative subscale, factor analysis identified a frontal GMV-cortical surface area factor. There was no significant diagnosis by structure interactions with symptom severity. Conclusions: Structural measures correlate with positive and negative symptom severity in psychotic disorders. Cortical thickness demonstrated more associations with psychopathology than cortical surface area.

AB - Introduction: Structural alterations may correlate with symptom severity in psychotic disorders, but the existing literature on this issue is heterogeneous. In addition, it is not known how cortical thickness and cortical surface area correlate with symptom dimensions of psychosis. Methods: Subjects included 455 individuals with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or bipolar I disorders. Data were obtained as part of the Bipolar Schizophrenia Network for Intermediate Phenotypes study. Diagnosis was made through the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Positive and negative symptom subscales were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Structural brain measurements were extracted from T1-weight structural MRIs using FreeSurfer v5.1 and were correlated with symptom subscales using partial correlations. Exploratory factor analysis was also used to identify factors among those regions correlating with symptom subscales. Results: The positive symptom subscale correlated inversely with gray matter volume (GMV) and cortical thickness in frontal and temporal regions, whereas the negative symptom subscale correlated inversely with right frontal cortical surface area. Among regions correlating with the positive subscale, factor analysis identified four factors, including a temporal cortical thickness factor and frontal GMV factor. Among regions correlating with the negative subscale, factor analysis identified a frontal GMV-cortical surface area factor. There was no significant diagnosis by structure interactions with symptom severity. Conclusions: Structural measures correlate with positive and negative symptom severity in psychotic disorders. Cortical thickness demonstrated more associations with psychopathology than cortical surface area.

KW - cortical thickness

KW - gray matter

KW - negative

KW - positive

KW - psychopathology

KW - surface area

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84928804179&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84928804179&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/schbul/sbu075

DO - 10.1093/schbul/sbu075

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 154

EP - 162

JO - Schizophrenia Bulletin

JF - Schizophrenia Bulletin

SN - 0586-7614

IS - 1

ER -