Corticostriatal circuit dysfunction in Huntingtons disease: Intersection of glutamate, dopamine and calcium

Benjamin Ray Miller, Ilya Bezprozvanny

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Huntingtons disease (HD) is a noncurable and progressive autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder that results from a polyglutamine expansion in the amino-terminal region of the huntingtin protein. The generation of rodent HD models has revealed that cellular dysfunction, rather than cell death alone, occurs early in the disease progression, appearing even before overt symptom onset. Much evidence has now established that dysfunction of the corticostriatal circuit is key to HD symptomology. In this article, we summarize the most current findings that implicate glutamate, dopamine and calcium signaling in this system and discuss how they work in concert to disrupt corticostriatal function. In addition, we highlight therapeutic strategies related to altered corticostriatal signaling in HD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)735-756
Number of pages22
JournalFuture Neurology
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

Keywords

  • Huntexils
  • Huntingtons disease
  • apoptosis
  • calcium
  • cortex dopamine
  • electrophysiology
  • glutamate
  • medium spiny neuron
  • neurodegeneration
  • striatum
  • tetrabenazine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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