Critical care of the pediatric patient with rheumatic disease

Andrew I. Shulman, Marilynn Punaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: Extensive systemic illness and treatment with immunosuppressive agents often require patients with rheumatic diseases to be monitored or managed in the pediatric intensive care unit. Additionally, severe disease-specific manifestations of childhood rheumatic disorders present pediatric rheumatologists and critical care physicians with diagnostic and treatment challenges. Although mortality from rheumatic disease in children is rare, the most severe diseases, such as pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile dermatomyositis, remain life-threatening. Recent findings: Advances in therapy have reduced the incidence of severe complications of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and have expanded treatment options. However, patients with active underlying rheumatic disease and secondary infection who are being treated with immunosuppressive agents are most at risk for poor outcomes. Summary: Here we discuss the complications of childhood rheumatic conditions that necessitate critical intervention. We discuss how improved understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of disease pathogenesis holds the promise of more targeted therapy without the adverse effects of global immunosuppression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-268
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pediatrics
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Critical Care
Rheumatic Diseases
Pediatrics
Immunosuppressive Agents
Therapeutics
Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Coinfection
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Immunosuppression
Autoimmune Diseases
Physicians
Mortality
Incidence

Keywords

  • complications of pediatric rheumatic disease
  • critical care
  • intensive care unit
  • pediatric rheumatology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Critical care of the pediatric patient with rheumatic disease. / Shulman, Andrew I.; Punaro, Marilynn.

In: Current Opinion in Pediatrics, Vol. 23, No. 3, 06.2011, p. 263-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shulman, Andrew I. ; Punaro, Marilynn. / Critical care of the pediatric patient with rheumatic disease. In: Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 2011 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 263-268.
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