Cross-lagged panel analysis of depression and behavioral dysfunction in the first year after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury

Shannon B. Juengst, John M. Myrga, Jesse R. Fann, Amy K. Wagner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Timely treatment of depression and behavioral dysfunction after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) could improve health, function, and quality of life. The authors hypothesized that 6-month depression would be the stronger contributor to later depression and behavioral dysfunction in a sample of 88 adults with moderate-to-severe TBI. A structural equation modeling cross-lagged panel analysis, adjusting for all 6-month predictors, revealed that 6-month depression had a stronger relationship to 12-month depression (βstand=0.55, p=0.002) and behavioral dysfunction (βstand=0.41, p=0.004) than did 6-month behavioral dysfunction (βstand=0.17, p=0.270, βstand =0.30, p=0.035). Depression may be in the developmental pathway to behavioral dysfunction, triggering a cycle of reciprocal causality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-266
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cross-lagged panel analysis of depression and behavioral dysfunction in the first year after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this