Current practice trends in allergy: Results of a united states survey of otolaryngologists, allergist-immunologists, and primary care physicians

Matthew W. Ryan, Bradley F. Marple, Bryan Leatherman, J. Whit Mims, John Fornadley, Maria Veling, Sandra Y. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Clinical practices for the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease evolve over time in response to a variety of forces. The techniques used by various physician specialties are not clearly defined and may vary from published descriptions or recommendations in the literature. Methods: This work is a Web-based survey enrolling 250 U.S. physicians in the following specialties: otolaryngology (ENT), allergy-immunology (A/I), and primary care (PCP). Results: Respondents reported that skin-prick testing is the most common diagnostic testing method, followed by in vitro specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) testing. ENTs were more likely to use intradermal testing compared to other specialties (p = 0.0003 vs A/I; p < 0.0001 vs PCP). Respondents reported a wide distribution in number of allergens tested, regardless of testing method (range, 11 to >60). Significant use of home immunotherapy injections (defined as >10% of immunotherapy patients) ranged from 27% to 36% of physicians, with no statistically significant difference noted based upon specialty. PCPs reported greater use of sublingual immunotherapy (PCP, 68%; A/I, 45%; otolaryngology, 35%; A/I vs PCP, p = 0.005; ENT vs PCP p < 0.001)). Conclusion: A variety of allergy testing and treatment methods are employed by U.S. physicians, with some differences noted based upon specialty. Home immunotherapy continues to be employed in allergy practices, and sublingual immunotherapy is a common form of delivery, especially in primary care practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)789-795
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Forum of Allergy and Rhinology
Volume4
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

Keywords

  • Allergen immunotherapy
  • Allergy
  • Allergy testing
  • Food allergy
  • Home immunotherapy
  • Sublingual immunotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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