Deep reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging and resolution scalability with depth

Kwang Hyun Song, Lihong V. Wang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A deep reflection-mode photoacoustic (PA) imaging system was designed and implemented to visualize deep structures in biological tissues. To achieve good penetration depth, we chose near IR laser pulses at 804 nm wavelength for the generation of photoacoustic waves. To avoid overshadowing the deep PA signals by the surface PA signals, we employed dark-field illumination. To achieve good lateral resolution, we chose spherically focused high-numericalaperture ultrasonic transducers with 5 MHz or 10 MHz center frequencies. By using these transducers, we achieved 153 μm and 130 μm axial resolutions, respectively, at 19.5 mm depth in 10% porcine gelatin containing 1% intralipid. The system was applied to imaging internal organs of small animals. Compared with our previous high-frequency (50-MHz) photoacoustic microscope, we scaled up the imaging depth while maintaining the ratio of the imaging depth to axial resolution more than 100. In addition, we studied the scalability of the imaging depth and the resolution with ultrasound frequency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume6437
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
EventPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2007: The Eighth Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 21 2007Jan 24 2007

Other

OtherPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2007: The Eighth Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/21/071/24/07

Fingerprint

Photoacoustic effect
Scalability
Imaging techniques
Ultrasonic transducers
Imaging systems
Transducers
Laser pulses
Animals
Microscopes
Lighting
Ultrasonics
Tissue
Wavelength

Keywords

  • Brain cortex
  • Deep
  • Kidney
  • Photoacoustic
  • Reflection-mode

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Song, K. H., & Wang, L. V. (2007). Deep reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging and resolution scalability with depth. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 6437). [643722] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.698823

Deep reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging and resolution scalability with depth. / Song, Kwang Hyun; Wang, Lihong V.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6437 2007. 643722.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Song, KH & Wang, LV 2007, Deep reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging and resolution scalability with depth. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 6437, 643722, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2007: The Eighth Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/21/07. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.698823
Song KH, Wang LV. Deep reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging and resolution scalability with depth. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6437. 2007. 643722 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.698823
Song, Kwang Hyun ; Wang, Lihong V. / Deep reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging and resolution scalability with depth. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6437 2007.
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