Deficits in generalized cognitive ability, visual sensorimotor function, and inhibitory control represent discrete domains of neurobehavioral deficit in psychotic disorders

Courtney L.M. Eskridge, William C. Hochberger, Erin T. Kaseda, Rebekka Lencer, James L. Reilly, Sarah K. Keedy, Richard S.E. Keefe, Godfrey D. Pearlson, Matcheri S. Keshavan, Carol A. Tamminga, John A Sweeney, S. Kristian Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Psychotic disorders are characterized by impaired cognition, yet some reports indicate specific deficits extend beyond reduced general cognitive ability. This study utilized exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic methods to evaluate the latent structure of a broad neurocognitive battery used in the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network of Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) study, which included neuropsychological and neurophysiological measures in psychotic disorder probands and their unaffected first-degree relatives. Findings indicate that the factor structure of data from this set of assessments is more complex than the unitary factor of global cognitive ability underlying the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS). In addition to assessing generalized cognitive ability, two other factors were identified: visual sensorimotor function and inhibitory behavioral control. This complex cognitive architecture, derived in controls, generalized to patients across the psychosis spectrum and to their unaffected relatives. These findings highlight the need for a more differentiated assessment of neurobehavioral functions in studies designed to test for diagnostically specific biomarkers, endophenotypes for gene discovery and beneficial effects of therapeutics on cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-60
Number of pages7
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume236
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • B-SNIP
  • Confirmatory factor analysis
  • Exploratory factor analysis
  • Psychosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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