Delayed-type hypersensitivity in the mouse: Effect of vinblastine on sensitization by sheep red blood cells

J. Kettman, H. Skarvall, M. Mathews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mice receiving antigen (SRBC: sheep red blood cells) and vinblastine on the same day (or the day after antigen stimulation) show greatly decreased numbers of plaque-forming cells in the spleen on the fourth day after antigenic stimulation. There is also some loss of viable splenic lymphocytes by the fourth day after immunization and vinblastine administration. The apparent delayed-type footpad swelling responses of such vinblastine- and antigen-treated mice are similar or greater than responses found in mice receiving antigen alone. The spleen cells of antigen- and "vinblastine plus antigen" -treated mice show the same amount of helper cell activity. However, mice receiving vinblastine 2 days after antigen, but 3 days prior to delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) testing, show diminsshed DTH responses compared to mice receiving antigen alone. There is also a loss of peripheral blood leukocytes in such mice and this vinblastine-induced depression of the DTH response probably represents some loss of effector abilities of treated mice. The interpretation of the DTH reactivity is difficult, because mice receiving vinblastine alone demonstrated an anomalous footpad swelling reaction of broad specificity that is not associated with the development of either antibody-forming cells or helper activity in the spleen of treated mice. The nature of this reaction appeared to be largely edematous and its origin at this time is not completely understood. Such reactions show no apparent infiltration of mononuclear cells, in contrast to the responses of mice immunized with sheep red blood cells or sheep red blood cells plus vinblastine. Because this anomalous reaction interferes with the quantitation of DTH reactions, it is difficult to draw conclusions concerning the effect of vinblastine on the activation of cells that mediate DTH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-82
Number of pages10
JournalImmunopharmacology
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1979

Fingerprint

Vinblastine
Delayed Hypersensitivity
Sheep
Erythrocytes
Antigens
Spleen
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Immunization
Leukocytes
Lymphocytes

Keywords

  • Delayed-type hypersensitivity
  • Helper T cells
  • Sheep red blood cells
  • Vinblastine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Delayed-type hypersensitivity in the mouse : Effect of vinblastine on sensitization by sheep red blood cells. / Kettman, J.; Skarvall, H.; Mathews, M.

In: Immunopharmacology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 1979, p. 73-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d70d0182dab844aa8b12cf38b9b43102,
title = "Delayed-type hypersensitivity in the mouse: Effect of vinblastine on sensitization by sheep red blood cells",
abstract = "Mice receiving antigen (SRBC: sheep red blood cells) and vinblastine on the same day (or the day after antigen stimulation) show greatly decreased numbers of plaque-forming cells in the spleen on the fourth day after antigenic stimulation. There is also some loss of viable splenic lymphocytes by the fourth day after immunization and vinblastine administration. The apparent delayed-type footpad swelling responses of such vinblastine- and antigen-treated mice are similar or greater than responses found in mice receiving antigen alone. The spleen cells of antigen- and {"}vinblastine plus antigen{"} -treated mice show the same amount of helper cell activity. However, mice receiving vinblastine 2 days after antigen, but 3 days prior to delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) testing, show diminsshed DTH responses compared to mice receiving antigen alone. There is also a loss of peripheral blood leukocytes in such mice and this vinblastine-induced depression of the DTH response probably represents some loss of effector abilities of treated mice. The interpretation of the DTH reactivity is difficult, because mice receiving vinblastine alone demonstrated an anomalous footpad swelling reaction of broad specificity that is not associated with the development of either antibody-forming cells or helper activity in the spleen of treated mice. The nature of this reaction appeared to be largely edematous and its origin at this time is not completely understood. Such reactions show no apparent infiltration of mononuclear cells, in contrast to the responses of mice immunized with sheep red blood cells or sheep red blood cells plus vinblastine. Because this anomalous reaction interferes with the quantitation of DTH reactions, it is difficult to draw conclusions concerning the effect of vinblastine on the activation of cells that mediate DTH.",
keywords = "Delayed-type hypersensitivity, Helper T cells, Sheep red blood cells, Vinblastine",
author = "J. Kettman and H. Skarvall and M. Mathews",
year = "1979",
doi = "10.1016/0162-3109(79)90022-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "73--82",
journal = "Immunopharmacology",
issn = "0162-3109",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Delayed-type hypersensitivity in the mouse

T2 - Effect of vinblastine on sensitization by sheep red blood cells

AU - Kettman, J.

AU - Skarvall, H.

AU - Mathews, M.

PY - 1979

Y1 - 1979

N2 - Mice receiving antigen (SRBC: sheep red blood cells) and vinblastine on the same day (or the day after antigen stimulation) show greatly decreased numbers of plaque-forming cells in the spleen on the fourth day after antigenic stimulation. There is also some loss of viable splenic lymphocytes by the fourth day after immunization and vinblastine administration. The apparent delayed-type footpad swelling responses of such vinblastine- and antigen-treated mice are similar or greater than responses found in mice receiving antigen alone. The spleen cells of antigen- and "vinblastine plus antigen" -treated mice show the same amount of helper cell activity. However, mice receiving vinblastine 2 days after antigen, but 3 days prior to delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) testing, show diminsshed DTH responses compared to mice receiving antigen alone. There is also a loss of peripheral blood leukocytes in such mice and this vinblastine-induced depression of the DTH response probably represents some loss of effector abilities of treated mice. The interpretation of the DTH reactivity is difficult, because mice receiving vinblastine alone demonstrated an anomalous footpad swelling reaction of broad specificity that is not associated with the development of either antibody-forming cells or helper activity in the spleen of treated mice. The nature of this reaction appeared to be largely edematous and its origin at this time is not completely understood. Such reactions show no apparent infiltration of mononuclear cells, in contrast to the responses of mice immunized with sheep red blood cells or sheep red blood cells plus vinblastine. Because this anomalous reaction interferes with the quantitation of DTH reactions, it is difficult to draw conclusions concerning the effect of vinblastine on the activation of cells that mediate DTH.

AB - Mice receiving antigen (SRBC: sheep red blood cells) and vinblastine on the same day (or the day after antigen stimulation) show greatly decreased numbers of plaque-forming cells in the spleen on the fourth day after antigenic stimulation. There is also some loss of viable splenic lymphocytes by the fourth day after immunization and vinblastine administration. The apparent delayed-type footpad swelling responses of such vinblastine- and antigen-treated mice are similar or greater than responses found in mice receiving antigen alone. The spleen cells of antigen- and "vinblastine plus antigen" -treated mice show the same amount of helper cell activity. However, mice receiving vinblastine 2 days after antigen, but 3 days prior to delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) testing, show diminsshed DTH responses compared to mice receiving antigen alone. There is also a loss of peripheral blood leukocytes in such mice and this vinblastine-induced depression of the DTH response probably represents some loss of effector abilities of treated mice. The interpretation of the DTH reactivity is difficult, because mice receiving vinblastine alone demonstrated an anomalous footpad swelling reaction of broad specificity that is not associated with the development of either antibody-forming cells or helper activity in the spleen of treated mice. The nature of this reaction appeared to be largely edematous and its origin at this time is not completely understood. Such reactions show no apparent infiltration of mononuclear cells, in contrast to the responses of mice immunized with sheep red blood cells or sheep red blood cells plus vinblastine. Because this anomalous reaction interferes with the quantitation of DTH reactions, it is difficult to draw conclusions concerning the effect of vinblastine on the activation of cells that mediate DTH.

KW - Delayed-type hypersensitivity

KW - Helper T cells

KW - Sheep red blood cells

KW - Vinblastine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018571586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018571586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0162-3109(79)90022-5

DO - 10.1016/0162-3109(79)90022-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 317905

AN - SCOPUS:0018571586

VL - 2

SP - 73

EP - 82

JO - Immunopharmacology

JF - Immunopharmacology

SN - 0162-3109

IS - 1

ER -