Depression, anxiety, and COPD: The unexamined role of nicotine dependence

Renee D. Goodwin, Kim L. Lavoie, Adina R. Lemeshow, Elizabeth Jenkins, E. Sherwood Brown, David A. Fedoronko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Previous studies have shown links between anxiety and depression and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but little is known about possible mechanisms of this association. The current study examined whether the observed relationship between anxiety and depression and COPD is explained by confounding due to cigarette smoking and lifetime nicotine dependence. Methods: Data were drawn from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a community-based representative sample of adults in the United States. Results: Analyses suggest that the association between anxiety disorders and COPD appears to be largely explained by confounding by former cigarette smoking and lifetime nicotine dependence. The association between mood disorders and COPD appears to be largely explained by confounding by lifetime nicotine dependence. Conclusions: These findings provide initial evidence suggesting that the association between anxiety, depression, and COPD may be at least partly attributable to confounding by cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence. Efforts toward prevention of chronic lung disease may be more effective if treatment and prevention efforts aimed at smoking cessation address mental health problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberntr165
Pages (from-to)176-183
Number of pages8
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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Tobacco Use Disorder
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Anxiety
Depression
Smoking
Smoking Cessation
Anxiety Disorders
Mood Disorders
Lung Diseases
Comorbidity
Mental Health
Chronic Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Goodwin, R. D., Lavoie, K. L., Lemeshow, A. R., Jenkins, E., Brown, E. S., & Fedoronko, D. A. (2012). Depression, anxiety, and COPD: The unexamined role of nicotine dependence. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 14(2), 176-183. [ntr165]. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntr165

Depression, anxiety, and COPD : The unexamined role of nicotine dependence. / Goodwin, Renee D.; Lavoie, Kim L.; Lemeshow, Adina R.; Jenkins, Elizabeth; Brown, E. Sherwood; Fedoronko, David A.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 14, No. 2, ntr165, 2012, p. 176-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goodwin, RD, Lavoie, KL, Lemeshow, AR, Jenkins, E, Brown, ES & Fedoronko, DA 2012, 'Depression, anxiety, and COPD: The unexamined role of nicotine dependence', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, vol. 14, no. 2, ntr165, pp. 176-183. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntr165
Goodwin, Renee D. ; Lavoie, Kim L. ; Lemeshow, Adina R. ; Jenkins, Elizabeth ; Brown, E. Sherwood ; Fedoronko, David A. / Depression, anxiety, and COPD : The unexamined role of nicotine dependence. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2012 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 176-183.
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