Depression in family practice: some effects on spouses and children.

R. B. Widmer, R. J. Cadoret, Carol S North

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Medical complaints and office visits of spouses and children of depressed patients were examined and compared to a matched comparison group of spouses and children of nondepressed patients. Both spouses and children of depressed patients showed increased numbers of visits and complaints which returned to control levels one year after the depression was diagnosed and treated. Infection, pain, functional, and anxiety complaints showed significant increases in spouses over controls. Definite diagnoses, infections, pain, and anxiety complaints were significantly increased in children compared to controls. In both spouses and children these complaints returned to control levels by the third period of the study, one year after the depression had been diagnosed (and treatment for depression started). The pain, functional, and anxiety complaints of spouses and children were very similar qualitatively to those of the depressed patients. The results demonstrate the validity of the family as a unit of medical care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-51
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Family Practice
Volume10
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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