Detection of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage in response to treatment with topoisomerase I inhibitors: A potential surrogate end point to assess treatment effectiveness

Cecilia M. Whitacre, Elizabeth Zborowska, James K V Willson, Nathan A. Berger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by caspases is a prominent characteristic of apoptosis or programmed cell death shown to be induced by topoisomerase (Topo) inhibitors. Because Topo I inhibitors have been shown to be effective in the treatment of some patients with colon cancer, we considered the possibility of using PARP cleavage as an early predictor of responsiveness to this class of agents. We show cleavage of PARP in response to treatment with Topo I inhibitors in colon cancer both in vitro and in vivo: (a) in vitro in SW480, HCT116, VACO5, VACO6, VACO8, VACO411, VACO425, and VACO451 human colon cancer cell lines treated with topotecan (TPT) or CPT-11; (b) in vivo in SW480, VACO451, and VRC5 colon cancer xenografts grown in athymic mice treated with TPT or CPT-11; and (c) in vivo in colon cancer samples from patients undergoing a Phase II clinical trial with CPT-11. Our results show a strong correlation between percentage of PARP cleavage and percentage of acridine orange-positive cells in colon cancer cell lines treated with 0.1 μM TPT for 24 and 48 h, confirming that PARP cleavage is a useful marker for programmed cell death in colon cancer cell lines. Results from experiments performed on colon cancer xenografts also show an association between PARP cleavage and response to treatment with TPT or CPT-11. The increase of PARP cleavage in xenografts and in clinical samples corresponding to treatment with Topo I inhibitors suggests that this procedure may have early predictive value to assess effectiveness of treatment. These results provide the basis for determining the validity of using PARP cleavage as an early marker of chemotherapeutic effectiveness in human samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-672
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume5
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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