Developing the PTSD checklist-I/F for the DSM-IV (PCL-I/F): Assessing PTSD symptom frequency and intensity in a pilot study of Male veterans with combat-related PTSD

Ryan Holliday, Julia Smith, Carol North, Alina Surís

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The widely used posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist (PCL) has established reliability and validity, but it does not differentiate posttraumatic symptom frequency from intensity as elements of posttraumatic symptom severity. Thus, the PCL in its existing form may not provide a comprehensive appraisal of posttraumatic symptomatology. Because of this, we modified the PCL to create the PCL-I/F that measures both frequency and intensity of PTSD symptoms via brief self-report. To establish validity and internal consistency of the PCL-I/F, we conducted a pilot study comparing PCL-I/F scores to structured diagnostic interview for PTSD (the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale [CAPS]) in a male combat veteran sample of 92 participants. Statistically significant correlations between the PCL-I/F and the CAPS were found, suggesting initial validation of the PCL-I/F to screen and assess frequency and intensity of combat-related PTSD symptoms. Implications are discussed for screening and assessment of PTSD related to combat and non-combat trauma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-69
Number of pages11
JournalBehavioral Sciences
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2015

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Combat-related PTSD
  • Male veterans
  • PCL
  • PCL-I/F
  • PTSD
  • PTSD checklist
  • PTSD symptom frequency
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Development
  • Genetics
  • Psychology(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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