Development, implementation, and short-term effectiveness of an interprofessional education course in a school of health professions

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is accepted that interprofessional education (IPE) has positive benefits for health profession students, including effective communication, increased teamwork skills, and better appreciation for the roles of other health professions. However, the question remains of how to effectively deliver IPE for health professions students in an educational environment. To address this problem, the University of Texas Southwestern School of Health Professions (SSHP) developed an IPE course, Interdisciplinary Development, Education, and Active Learning (IDEAL), incorporating seven disciplines represented within the school. The hypothesis was that a two-semester exposure to the new curriculum and related activities would have a significant positive influence on students' understanding of the elements required for effective communication (e.g., listening and interpersonal skills), teamwork skills, and understanding the roles of other health professions. An assessment of a student's understanding of communication and teamwork skills was administered on the first and last day of the IDEAL course to test the hypothesis and determine if course objectives of improving student's communication and teamwork skills were met. Questions were divided into three focus areas of teamwork, listening, and interpersonal communication. Findings showed a significant (p > 0.016) increase in scores for all three areas, the largest being in teamwork. Also, results from an anonymous, open-ended survey of the overall IDEAL course at the end of the course showed overwhelming consensus regarding the success and effectiveness of the healthcare team grand rounds presentations from which the students learned about other professions and their roles on the healthcare team in a case-based format.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-20
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Allied Health
Volume41
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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Health Occupations
School Health Services
Students
Education
Communication
Problem-Based Learning
Patient Care Team
Teaching Rounds
Curriculum
Consensus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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abstract = "It is accepted that interprofessional education (IPE) has positive benefits for health profession students, including effective communication, increased teamwork skills, and better appreciation for the roles of other health professions. However, the question remains of how to effectively deliver IPE for health professions students in an educational environment. To address this problem, the University of Texas Southwestern School of Health Professions (SSHP) developed an IPE course, Interdisciplinary Development, Education, and Active Learning (IDEAL), incorporating seven disciplines represented within the school. The hypothesis was that a two-semester exposure to the new curriculum and related activities would have a significant positive influence on students' understanding of the elements required for effective communication (e.g., listening and interpersonal skills), teamwork skills, and understanding the roles of other health professions. An assessment of a student's understanding of communication and teamwork skills was administered on the first and last day of the IDEAL course to test the hypothesis and determine if course objectives of improving student's communication and teamwork skills were met. Questions were divided into three focus areas of teamwork, listening, and interpersonal communication. Findings showed a significant (p > 0.016) increase in scores for all three areas, the largest being in teamwork. Also, results from an anonymous, open-ended survey of the overall IDEAL course at the end of the course showed overwhelming consensus regarding the success and effectiveness of the healthcare team grand rounds presentations from which the students learned about other professions and their roles on the healthcare team in a case-based format.",
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