Developmental model of parent-child coordination for self-regulation across childhood and into emerging adulthood: Type 1 diabetes management as an example

Cynthia A. Berg, Jonathan Butner, Deborah J. Wiebe, Amy Hughes Lansing, Peter Osborn, Pamela S. King, Debra L. Palmer, Jorie M. Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Developing individuals and their families benefit from a warm and supportive relationship that fosters the development of good self-regulatory skills in the child needed for a host of positive developmental outcomes. Children and parents face special challenges to self-regulation when faced with a child's chronic illness. A developmental model is presented that traces how positive parental involvement is coordinated with a child's self-regulation skills (regulation of cognition, emotion, and behavior) that are essential for positive health management. This involves different temporal patterns of coordination of child and parent (and other close relationships) that lead to accumulating regulatory developments that afford benefits for managing illness. This process begins early in infancy through attachment and develops into childhood and adolescence to involve the coordination of parental monitoring and child disclosure that serves as a training ground for the expansion of social relationships beyond the family during emerging adulthood. The specific case of families dealing with type 1 diabetes is used to illustrate the transactional and dynamic nature of parent-child coordination across development. We conclude that a developmental model of parent-child coordination holds promise for understanding positive health outcomes and offers new methodological and statistical tools for the examination of development of both child and parent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDevelopmental Review
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Coordination
  • Diabetes management
  • Parent-child relationships
  • Self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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