Diabetes and apoptosis: Lipotoxicity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

161 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is an established risk factor in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease; all components that are part of the metabolic syndrome. Traditionally, insulin resistance has been defined in a glucocentric perspective. However, elevated systemic levels of fatty acids are now considered significant contributors towards the pathophysiological aspects associated with the syndrome. An overaccumulation of unoxidized long-chain fatty acids can saturate the storage capacity of adipose tissue, resulting in a lipid 'spill over' to non-adipose tissues, such as the liver, muscle, heart, and pancreatic-islets. Under these circumstances, such ectopic lipid deposition can have deleterious effects. The excess lipids are driven into alternative non-oxidative pathways, which result in the formation of reactive lipid moieties that promote metabolically relevant cellular dysfunction (lipotoxicity) and programmed cell-death (lipoapoptosis). Here, we focus on how both of these processes affect metabolically significant cell-types and highlight how lipotoxicity and sequential lipoapoptosis are as major mediators of insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1484-1495
Number of pages12
JournalApoptosis
Volume14
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

Fingerprint

Medical problems
Apoptosis
Lipids
Insulin Resistance
Insulin
Cardiovascular Diseases
Fatty Acids
Tissue
Hazardous materials spills
Cell death
Islets of Langerhans
Liver
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Muscle
Adipose Tissue
Myocardium
Cell Death
Obesity

Keywords

  • Adiponectin
  • Apoptosis
  • Diabetes
  • Leptin
  • Lipotoxicity
  • Pancreatic β-cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Cancer Research
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Diabetes and apoptosis : Lipotoxicity. / Kusminski, Christine; Shetty, Shoba; Orci, Lelio; Unger, Roger H; Scherer, Philipp E.

In: Apoptosis, Vol. 14, No. 12, 12.2009, p. 1484-1495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kusminski, Christine ; Shetty, Shoba ; Orci, Lelio ; Unger, Roger H ; Scherer, Philipp E. / Diabetes and apoptosis : Lipotoxicity. In: Apoptosis. 2009 ; Vol. 14, No. 12. pp. 1484-1495.
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