Diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia: Prevalence over time and impact on long-term survival after liver transplantation

J. Parekh, D. A. Corley, S. Feng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With increasing short-term survival, the transplant community has turned its focus to delineating the impact of medical comorbidities on long-term outcomes. Unfortunately, conditions such as diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia are difficult to track and often managed outside of the transplant center by primary care providers. We collaborated with Kaiser Permanente Northern California to create a database of 598 liver transplant recipients, which incorporates diagnostic codes along with laboratory and pharmacy data. Specifically, we determined the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia both before and after transplant and evaluated the influence of disease duration as a time-dependent covariate on posttransplant survival. The prevalence of these comorbidities increased steadily from the time of transplant to 7 years after transplant. The estimated risk for all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.07 per year increment, 95% CI 1.01-1.13, p < 0.02) and mortality secondary to cardiovascular events, infection/multisystem organ failure and allograft failure (hazard ratio = 1.08 per year increment, 95% CI 1.00-1.16, p = 0.05) increased for each additional year of diabetes. No associations were found for duration of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. Greater attention to management of diabetes may mitigate its negative impact on long-term survival in liver transplant recipients. A unique integration of longitudinal data from a transplant center and integrated healthcare delivery organization shows that the duration of diabetes, but not hypertension or hyperlipidemia, is a significant predictor of long-term mortality for adult liver transplant recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2181-2187
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume12
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

Fingerprint

Hyperlipidemias
Liver Transplantation
Hypertension
Transplants
Survival
Mortality
Comorbidity
Liver
Cardiovascular Infections
Allografts
Primary Health Care
Organizations
Databases
Delivery of Health Care
Transplant Recipients

Keywords

  • Liver transplantation
  • metabolic disorders
  • mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia : Prevalence over time and impact on long-term survival after liver transplantation. / Parekh, J.; Corley, D. A.; Feng, S.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 12, No. 8, 01.08.2012, p. 2181-2187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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