Diagnosis and Management of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in the ICU

Won Y. Lee, Babak Mokhlesi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is characterized by obesity, daytime hypercapnia, and sleep-disordered breathing in the absence of other known causes of hypercapnia. Because of the global obesity epidemic and the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in the general population, critical care physicians are likely to encounter patients who have acute-on-chronic respiratory failure attributable to OHS in their clinical practice. In this review we define the clinical characteristics of OHS, review its pathophysiology, and discuss the morbidity and mortality associated with OHS. Finally, we offer treatment strategies during ICU management using noninvasive positive pressure ventilation that may guide the physician in the care of these challenging patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-549
Number of pages17
JournalCritical Care Clinics
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

Fingerprint

Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome
Hypercapnia
Obesity
Physicians
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Critical Care
Respiratory Insufficiency
Patient Care
Morbidity
Mortality
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Diagnosis and Management of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in the ICU. / Lee, Won Y.; Mokhlesi, Babak.

In: Critical Care Clinics, Vol. 24, No. 3, 07.2008, p. 533-549.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{655d1686035f4b0a8957681d15e942a2,
title = "Diagnosis and Management of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in the ICU",
abstract = "Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is characterized by obesity, daytime hypercapnia, and sleep-disordered breathing in the absence of other known causes of hypercapnia. Because of the global obesity epidemic and the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in the general population, critical care physicians are likely to encounter patients who have acute-on-chronic respiratory failure attributable to OHS in their clinical practice. In this review we define the clinical characteristics of OHS, review its pathophysiology, and discuss the morbidity and mortality associated with OHS. Finally, we offer treatment strategies during ICU management using noninvasive positive pressure ventilation that may guide the physician in the care of these challenging patients.",
author = "Lee, {Won Y.} and Babak Mokhlesi",
year = "2008",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.ccc.2008.02.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "533--549",
journal = "Critical Care Clinics",
issn = "0749-0704",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diagnosis and Management of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in the ICU

AU - Lee, Won Y.

AU - Mokhlesi, Babak

PY - 2008/7

Y1 - 2008/7

N2 - Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is characterized by obesity, daytime hypercapnia, and sleep-disordered breathing in the absence of other known causes of hypercapnia. Because of the global obesity epidemic and the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in the general population, critical care physicians are likely to encounter patients who have acute-on-chronic respiratory failure attributable to OHS in their clinical practice. In this review we define the clinical characteristics of OHS, review its pathophysiology, and discuss the morbidity and mortality associated with OHS. Finally, we offer treatment strategies during ICU management using noninvasive positive pressure ventilation that may guide the physician in the care of these challenging patients.

AB - Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is characterized by obesity, daytime hypercapnia, and sleep-disordered breathing in the absence of other known causes of hypercapnia. Because of the global obesity epidemic and the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in the general population, critical care physicians are likely to encounter patients who have acute-on-chronic respiratory failure attributable to OHS in their clinical practice. In this review we define the clinical characteristics of OHS, review its pathophysiology, and discuss the morbidity and mortality associated with OHS. Finally, we offer treatment strategies during ICU management using noninvasive positive pressure ventilation that may guide the physician in the care of these challenging patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=44449146033&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=44449146033&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ccc.2008.02.003

DO - 10.1016/j.ccc.2008.02.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 18538199

AN - SCOPUS:44449146033

VL - 24

SP - 533

EP - 549

JO - Critical Care Clinics

JF - Critical Care Clinics

SN - 0749-0704

IS - 3

ER -