Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome

Diana Zepeda-Orozco, Raymond Quigley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dialysis disequilibrium syndrome is a rare but serious complication of hemodialysis. Despite the fact that maintenance hemodialysis has been a routine procedure for over 50 years, this syndrome remains poorly understood. The signs and symptoms vary widely from restlessness and headache to coma and death. While cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure are the primary contributing factors to this syndrome and are the target of therapy, the precise mechanisms for their development remain elusive. Treatment of this syndrome once it has developed is rarely successful. Thus, measures to avoid its development are crucial. In this review, we will examine the pathophysiology of this syndrome and discuss the factors to consider in avoiding its development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2205-2211
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Nephrology
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Dialysis
Renal Dialysis
Psychomotor Agitation
Brain Edema
Intracranial Pressure
Coma
Signs and Symptoms
Headache
Maintenance
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Hemodialysis
  • Idiogenic osmoles
  • Reverse urea effect
  • Urea kinetics
  • Uremia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome. / Zepeda-Orozco, Diana; Quigley, Raymond.

In: Pediatric Nephrology, Vol. 27, No. 12, 12.2012, p. 2205-2211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zepeda-Orozco, Diana ; Quigley, Raymond. / Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome. In: Pediatric Nephrology. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 12. pp. 2205-2211.
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