Dietary antioxidants and prostate cancer: A review

Terrence M. Vance, Joseph Su, Elizabeth T.H. Fontham, Sung I. Koo, Ock K. Chun

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Several studies have examined the relationship between prostate cancer and antioxidants; however, the results of these studies are inconsistent. This article provides a systematic review of studies on prostate cancer and antioxidant intake from diet and supplements. Tea and coffee appear to offer protection against advanced prostate cancer. Different forms of vitamin E appear to exert different effects on prostate cancer, with alpha-tocopherol potentially increasing and gamma-tocopherol potentially decreasing risk of the disease. There is no strong evidence for a beneficial effect of selenium, vitamin C, or beta-carotene, whereas lycopene appears to be negatively associated with risk of the disease. The effect of dietary antioxidants on prostate cancer remains undefined and inconclusive, with different antioxidants affecting prostate cancer risk differentially. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between antioxidants and prostate cancer risk and to delineate the underlying mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)793-801
Number of pages9
JournalNutrition and Cancer
Volume65
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Oncology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cancer Research

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