Difference in disease burden and activity in pediatric patients on brain magnetic resonance imaging at time of multiple sclerosis onset vs adults

Emmanuelle Waubant, Dorothee Chabas, Darin T. Okuda, Orit Glenn, Ellen Mowry, Roland G. Henry, Jonathan B. Strober, Bruno Soares, Max Wintermark, Daniel Pelletier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To compare initial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of children and adults at multiple sclerosis (MS) onset. Design: Retrospective analysis of features of first brain MRI available at MS onset in patients with pediatriconset and adult-onset MS. Setting: A pediatric and an adult MS center. Patients: Patients with pediatric-onset <18 years) and adult-onset (≥18 years) MS. Main Outcome Measures: Weevaluated initial and second (when available) brain MRI scans obtained at the time of firstMSsymptoms for lesions that were T2-bright, ovoid and well defined, large (≥1cm), or enhancing. Results: We identified 41 patients with pediatric-onset MS and 35 patients with adult-onset MS. Children had a higher number of total T2- (median, 21 vs 6; P<.001) and large T2-bright areas (median, 4 vs 0; P<.001) than adults. Children more frequently had T2-bright foci in the posterior fossa (68.3% vs 31.4%; P=.001) and enhancing lesions (68.4% vs 21.2%; P<.001) than adults. On the second brain MRI, children had more new T2-bright (median, 2.5 vs 0; P<.001) and gadolinium-enhancing foci (P<.001) than adults. Except for corpus callosum involvement, race/ethnicity was not strongly associated with disease burden or lesion location on the first scan, although other associations cannot be excluded because of the width of the confidence intervals. Conclusion: While it is unknown whether the higher disease burden, posterior fossa involvement, and rate of new lesions in pediatric-onset MS are explained by age alone, these characteristics have been associated with worse disability progression in adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)967-971
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume66
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009

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Multiple Sclerosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Pediatrics
Brain
Burden
Onset
Corpus Callosum
Gadolinium
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals
Lesion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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Difference in disease burden and activity in pediatric patients on brain magnetic resonance imaging at time of multiple sclerosis onset vs adults. / Waubant, Emmanuelle; Chabas, Dorothee; Okuda, Darin T.; Glenn, Orit; Mowry, Ellen; Henry, Roland G.; Strober, Jonathan B.; Soares, Bruno; Wintermark, Max; Pelletier, Daniel.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 66, No. 8, 08.2009, p. 967-971.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waubant, E, Chabas, D, Okuda, DT, Glenn, O, Mowry, E, Henry, RG, Strober, JB, Soares, B, Wintermark, M & Pelletier, D 2009, 'Difference in disease burden and activity in pediatric patients on brain magnetic resonance imaging at time of multiple sclerosis onset vs adults', Archives of Neurology, vol. 66, no. 8, pp. 967-971. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneurol.2009.135
Waubant, Emmanuelle ; Chabas, Dorothee ; Okuda, Darin T. ; Glenn, Orit ; Mowry, Ellen ; Henry, Roland G. ; Strober, Jonathan B. ; Soares, Bruno ; Wintermark, Max ; Pelletier, Daniel. / Difference in disease burden and activity in pediatric patients on brain magnetic resonance imaging at time of multiple sclerosis onset vs adults. In: Archives of Neurology. 2009 ; Vol. 66, No. 8. pp. 967-971.
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abstract = "Objective: To compare initial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of children and adults at multiple sclerosis (MS) onset. Design: Retrospective analysis of features of first brain MRI available at MS onset in patients with pediatriconset and adult-onset MS. Setting: A pediatric and an adult MS center. Patients: Patients with pediatric-onset <18 years) and adult-onset (≥18 years) MS. Main Outcome Measures: Weevaluated initial and second (when available) brain MRI scans obtained at the time of firstMSsymptoms for lesions that were T2-bright, ovoid and well defined, large (≥1cm), or enhancing. Results: We identified 41 patients with pediatric-onset MS and 35 patients with adult-onset MS. Children had a higher number of total T2- (median, 21 vs 6; P<.001) and large T2-bright areas (median, 4 vs 0; P<.001) than adults. Children more frequently had T2-bright foci in the posterior fossa (68.3{\%} vs 31.4{\%}; P=.001) and enhancing lesions (68.4{\%} vs 21.2{\%}; P<.001) than adults. On the second brain MRI, children had more new T2-bright (median, 2.5 vs 0; P<.001) and gadolinium-enhancing foci (P<.001) than adults. Except for corpus callosum involvement, race/ethnicity was not strongly associated with disease burden or lesion location on the first scan, although other associations cannot be excluded because of the width of the confidence intervals. Conclusion: While it is unknown whether the higher disease burden, posterior fossa involvement, and rate of new lesions in pediatric-onset MS are explained by age alone, these characteristics have been associated with worse disability progression in adults.",
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T1 - Difference in disease burden and activity in pediatric patients on brain magnetic resonance imaging at time of multiple sclerosis onset vs adults

AU - Waubant, Emmanuelle

AU - Chabas, Dorothee

AU - Okuda, Darin T.

AU - Glenn, Orit

AU - Mowry, Ellen

AU - Henry, Roland G.

AU - Strober, Jonathan B.

AU - Soares, Bruno

AU - Wintermark, Max

AU - Pelletier, Daniel

PY - 2009/8

Y1 - 2009/8

N2 - Objective: To compare initial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of children and adults at multiple sclerosis (MS) onset. Design: Retrospective analysis of features of first brain MRI available at MS onset in patients with pediatriconset and adult-onset MS. Setting: A pediatric and an adult MS center. Patients: Patients with pediatric-onset <18 years) and adult-onset (≥18 years) MS. Main Outcome Measures: Weevaluated initial and second (when available) brain MRI scans obtained at the time of firstMSsymptoms for lesions that were T2-bright, ovoid and well defined, large (≥1cm), or enhancing. Results: We identified 41 patients with pediatric-onset MS and 35 patients with adult-onset MS. Children had a higher number of total T2- (median, 21 vs 6; P<.001) and large T2-bright areas (median, 4 vs 0; P<.001) than adults. Children more frequently had T2-bright foci in the posterior fossa (68.3% vs 31.4%; P=.001) and enhancing lesions (68.4% vs 21.2%; P<.001) than adults. On the second brain MRI, children had more new T2-bright (median, 2.5 vs 0; P<.001) and gadolinium-enhancing foci (P<.001) than adults. Except for corpus callosum involvement, race/ethnicity was not strongly associated with disease burden or lesion location on the first scan, although other associations cannot be excluded because of the width of the confidence intervals. Conclusion: While it is unknown whether the higher disease burden, posterior fossa involvement, and rate of new lesions in pediatric-onset MS are explained by age alone, these characteristics have been associated with worse disability progression in adults.

AB - Objective: To compare initial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of children and adults at multiple sclerosis (MS) onset. Design: Retrospective analysis of features of first brain MRI available at MS onset in patients with pediatriconset and adult-onset MS. Setting: A pediatric and an adult MS center. Patients: Patients with pediatric-onset <18 years) and adult-onset (≥18 years) MS. Main Outcome Measures: Weevaluated initial and second (when available) brain MRI scans obtained at the time of firstMSsymptoms for lesions that were T2-bright, ovoid and well defined, large (≥1cm), or enhancing. Results: We identified 41 patients with pediatric-onset MS and 35 patients with adult-onset MS. Children had a higher number of total T2- (median, 21 vs 6; P<.001) and large T2-bright areas (median, 4 vs 0; P<.001) than adults. Children more frequently had T2-bright foci in the posterior fossa (68.3% vs 31.4%; P=.001) and enhancing lesions (68.4% vs 21.2%; P<.001) than adults. On the second brain MRI, children had more new T2-bright (median, 2.5 vs 0; P<.001) and gadolinium-enhancing foci (P<.001) than adults. Except for corpus callosum involvement, race/ethnicity was not strongly associated with disease burden or lesion location on the first scan, although other associations cannot be excluded because of the width of the confidence intervals. Conclusion: While it is unknown whether the higher disease burden, posterior fossa involvement, and rate of new lesions in pediatric-onset MS are explained by age alone, these characteristics have been associated with worse disability progression in adults.

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