Differences in regional cerebral blood flow response to a 5HT3 antagonist in early- and late-onset cocaine-dependent subjects

Bryon Adinoff, Michael D. Devous, Mark J. Williams, Thomas S. Harris, Susan E. Best, Hongyun Dong, Tanya Zielinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5HT3) receptors are important modulators of mesostriatal dopaminergic transmission and have been implicated in the pathophysiology of cocaine reward, withdrawal and self-administration. In addition, the 5HT3 antagonist ondansetron is effective in treating early-onset, but not late-onset, alcohol-dependent subjects. To explore the role of 5HT3 receptor systems in cocaine addiction using functioning imaging, we administered ondansetron to 23 abstinent, treatment-seeking cocaine-addicted and 22 sex-, age- and race-matched healthy control participants. Differences between early- (first use before 20 years, n = 10) and late-onset (first use after 20 years, n = 10) cocaine-addicted subjects were also assessed. On two separate days, subjects were administered ondansetron (0.15 mg/kg intravenously over 15 minutes) or saline. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured following each infusion with single photon emission computed tomography. No significant rCBF differences between the cocaine-addicted and control participants were observed following ondansetron relative to saline. Early-onset subjects, however, showed increased (P < 0.001) right posterior parahippocampal rCBF following ondansetron. In contrast, late-onset subjects showed decreased rCBF following ondansetron in an overlapping region of the right parahippocampal/ hippocampal gyrus. Early-onset subjects also displayed increased rCBF in the left anterior insula and subthalamic nucleus following ondansetron; late-onset subjects showed decreased rCBF in the right anterior insula. These findings suggest that the age of drug use onset is associated with serotonergic biosignatures in cocaine-addicted subjects. Further clarification of these alterations may guide targeted treatment with serotonergic medications similar to those successfully used in alcohol-dependent patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-261
Number of pages12
JournalAddiction Biology
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Ondansetron
Serotonin Antagonists
Regional Blood Flow
Cocaine
Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT3
Parahippocampal Gyrus
Alcohols
Subthalamic Nucleus
Cocaine-Related Disorders
Self Administration
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Reward
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • 5HT3 receptors
  • cocaine addiction
  • hippocampus
  • neuroimaging
  • serotonin
  • SPECT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Adinoff, B., Devous, M. D., Williams, M. J., Harris, T. S., Best, S. E., Dong, H., & Zielinski, T. (2014). Differences in regional cerebral blood flow response to a 5HT3 antagonist in early- and late-onset cocaine-dependent subjects. Addiction Biology, 19(2), 250-261. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00450.x

Differences in regional cerebral blood flow response to a 5HT3 antagonist in early- and late-onset cocaine-dependent subjects. / Adinoff, Bryon; Devous, Michael D.; Williams, Mark J.; Harris, Thomas S.; Best, Susan E.; Dong, Hongyun; Zielinski, Tanya.

In: Addiction Biology, Vol. 19, No. 2, 03.2014, p. 250-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adinoff, Bryon ; Devous, Michael D. ; Williams, Mark J. ; Harris, Thomas S. ; Best, Susan E. ; Dong, Hongyun ; Zielinski, Tanya. / Differences in regional cerebral blood flow response to a 5HT3 antagonist in early- and late-onset cocaine-dependent subjects. In: Addiction Biology. 2014 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 250-261.
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