Differentiation of bone marrow-derived lymphocytes.

J. W. Uhr, E. S. Vitetta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Murine lymphocytes were enzymatically radioiodinated and the class of immunoglobulin (isotype) on the cell surface was studied as a function of differentiation and ontogeny. The results indicate that IgM is the first isotype to appear and that IgD is subsequently acquired. A proportion of IgM-bearing cells also bear IgD. The acquisition of IgD does not appear to be under the influence of the thymus or of exposure to antigen. The observations suggest a sequence of differentiation steps in which B-cells first express IgM then acquire IgD (to become "double bearers"), and eventually lose IgM. The relationship of the IgD-bearing cells to the IgG-bearing memory cells has not yet been established. The implications of these findings with regard to function and genetic organization are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-300
Number of pages6
JournalNational Cancer Institute Monograph
Issue number48
StatePublished - May 1978

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Immunoglobulin D
Bone Marrow
Immunoglobulin M
Lymphocytes
Immunoglobulin Isotypes
Thymus Gland
B-Lymphocytes
Immunoglobulin G
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Differentiation of bone marrow-derived lymphocytes. / Uhr, J. W.; Vitetta, E. S.

In: National Cancer Institute Monograph, No. 48, 05.1978, p. 295-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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