Diffuse microvascular C5b-9 deposition is a common feature in muscle and nerve biopsies from diabetic patients

Paul C. Yell, Dennis K. Burns, Evan G. Dittmar, Charles L. White, Chunyu Cai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Terminal complement complex deposition in endomysial capillaries detected by a C5b-9 immunostain is considered a diagnostic feature for dermatomyositis. However, we found widespread microvascular C5b-9 reactivity in a substantial subset of muscle biopsies with denervation changes, and in nerve biopsies of peripheral neuropathies, particularly in patients with diabetes. It is unclear whether the presence of C5b-9 deposition signifies active immune-mediated vascular injury that requires immune suppression therapy. We retrospectively identified 63 nerve biopsies in patients with a documented history of diabetes, 26 of which had concomitant muscle biopsies, as well as 54 control nerve biopsies in patients without a documented diabetes history, 18 of which had concomitant muscle biopsies. C5b-9 immunostain was performed on all cases. 87% of the nerve biopsies and 92% of the muscle biopsies from diabetic patients showed microvascular C5b-9 reactivity, compared to 34% and 50% in non-diabetic patients. The differences were statistically significant (p < 0.0001 for nerve and p = 0.002 for muscle). The C5b-9 reactivity was generally proportional to the extent of microvascular sclerosis in diabetic patients, but unrelated to inflammation or vasculitis. C5b-9 deposition in micro-vasculature in both muscle and nerve is therefore a common feature in patients with diabetic neuropathies and may have diagnostic utility. Precaution needs to be taken before using muscle capillary C5b-9 reactivity as evidence of myositis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalActa neuropathologica communications
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 20 2018

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Keywords

  • C5b-9
  • Diabetes
  • Muscle biopsy
  • Nerve biopsy
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Terminal complement complex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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