Directing flux in glycan biosynthetic pathways with a small molecule switch

Jennifer J. Kohler, Jennifer L. Czlapinski, Scott T. Laughlin, Michael W. Schelle, Christopher L. De Graffenried, Carolyn R. Bertozzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Directing sugar traffic. Golgi-resident glycosyltransferases act in concert to direct synthesis of a wide variety of cell-surface glycans. A re-engineered fucosyltransferase, whose activity is controlled with the small molecule rapamycin, can be used to divert flux away from production of one glycan (αGal) and toward synthesis of another (H antigen).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1455-1458
Number of pages4
JournalChemBioChem
Volume5
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 4 2004

Keywords

  • Carbohydrates
  • Cell surface
  • Chemical genetics
  • Glycosylation
  • Protein engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Organic Chemistry

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  • Cite this

    Kohler, J. J., Czlapinski, J. L., Laughlin, S. T., Schelle, M. W., De Graffenried, C. L., & Bertozzi, C. R. (2004). Directing flux in glycan biosynthetic pathways with a small molecule switch. ChemBioChem, 5(10), 1455-1458. https://doi.org/10.1002/cbic.200400156