Direction and magnitude of displacement differ between slowly expanding and non-expanding multiple sclerosis lesions as compared to small vessel disease

Tatum M. Moog, Morgan McCreary, Andrew Wilson, Thomas Stanley, Fang F. Yu, Marco Pinho, Xiaohu Guo, Darin T. Okuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and purpose: Differentiating between multiple sclerosis (MS) and small vessel disease (SVD) lesions represents a key challenge in the day-to-day management of patients. We aimed to distinguish between MS and SVD by identifying the dynamics of lesion movement patterns between enlarging and contracting foci from two MRI time points. Methods: Standardized 3-Tesla 3-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed at two time points on enrolled MS and SVD patients. Selected supratentorial lesions were segmented and longitudinal changes in the direction of lesion displacement and magnitude along with the evolution of contracting and expanding T1-weighted and T2-weighted MS lesions were quantified based on lesion centroid positioning. Bayesian linear mixed effects regression models were constructed to evaluate associations between changes in lesion transitions and disease state. Results: A total of 420 lesions were analyzed from 35 MS (female (F):22 (62.9%); median age (range):38 years (y) (22–61), median disease duration:7.38y (0.38–20.99)) and 12 SVD patients (F:11 (100%); 54y (40–66)). MS T2-weighted lesions that increased in volume between MRI time points demonstrated movement toward the cortex (p = 0.01), whereas those that decreased in volume moved toward the center (p < 0.0001). Lesion volume changes related to SVD demonstrated no effect on movement direction over time. Both expanding (p = 0.03) and contracting (p = 0.01) MS lesions demonstrated greater distances between centroids when compared to SVD. Conclusion: Lesion dynamics may reveal distinct characteristics associated with the biology of disease while providing further insights into the behavior of inflammatory CNS disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of neurology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 3-dimensional
  • MRI
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Slowly expanding lesions
  • Small vessel disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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