Discrepancies in Communication Versus Documentation of Weight-Management Benchmarks: Analysis of Recorded Visits With Latino Children and Associated Health-Record Documentation

Christy B. Turer, Sarah E. Barlow, Sergio Montaño, Glenn Flores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

To examine gaps in communication versus documentation of weight-management clinical practices, communication was recorded during primary care visits with 6- to 12-year-old overweight/obese Latino children. Communication/documentation content was coded by 3 reviewers using communication transcripts and health-record documentation. Discrepancies in communication/documentation content codes were resolved through consensus. Bivariate/multivariable analyses examined factors associated with discrepancies in benchmark communication/documentation. Benchmarks were neither communicated nor documented in up to 42% of visits, and communicated but not documented or documented but not communicated in up to 20% of visits. Lowest benchmark performance rates were for laboratory studies (35%) and nutrition/weight-management referrals (42%). In multivariable analysis, overweight (vs obesity) was associated with 1.6 more discrepancies in communication versus documentation (P =.03). Many weight-management benchmarks are not met, not documented, or performed without being communicated. Enhanced communication with families and documentation in health records may promote lifestyle changes in overweight children and higher quality care for overweight children in primary care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGlobal Pediatric Health
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Keywords

  • childhood obesity
  • communication
  • primary care
  • weight management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pediatrics

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