Disease modifying agent related skin reactions in multiple sclerosis: Prevention, assessment, and management

Elliot Frohman, K. Brannon, Sherry Alexander, D. Sims, J. T. Phillips, S. O'Leary, K. Hawker, M. K. Racke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The objective for this article is to highlight some of the adverse skin manifestations associated with injectable disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). Early identification and intervention can often lead to minimal consequences and prolonged patient tolerance and compliance with these agents. At the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas and Texas Neurology in Dallas we actively follow approximately 5000 MS patients. The majority of our patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or secondary progressive MS (SPMS) are treated with one of the currently available disease modifying agents (DMAs). Our experience with these patients, and the challenges they face in continuing long-term treatment, constitutes the basis of our proposed treatment strategies. Conclusion: Skin reactions in response to injectable DMA therapy in MS are generally mild. However, some reactions can evolve into potentially serious lesions culminating in infection, necrosis, and in some circumstances requiring surgical repair.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)302-307
Number of pages6
JournalMultiple Sclerosis
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

Keywords

  • Abscess
  • Erythema
  • Glatiramer acetate
  • Interferon beta
  • Necrosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Disease modifying agent related skin reactions in multiple sclerosis: Prevention, assessment, and management'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Frohman, E., Brannon, K., Alexander, S., Sims, D., Phillips, J. T., O'Leary, S., Hawker, K., & Racke, M. K. (2004). Disease modifying agent related skin reactions in multiple sclerosis: Prevention, assessment, and management. Multiple Sclerosis, 10(3), 302-307. https://doi.org/10.1191/1352458504ms1002oa