Distal lower motor neuron syndrome with high-titer serum IgM anti-GM1 antibodies: Improvement following immunotherapy with monthly plasma exchange and intravenous cyclophosphamide

A. Pestronk, G. Lopate, A. J. Kornberg, J. L. Elliott, G. Blume, W. C. Yee, L. T. Goodnough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Motor neuropathies associated with electrodiagnostic evidence of motor conduction block often improve after treatment with immunotherapy, but there is less evidence about the responsiveness of lower motor neuron (LMN) syndromes without conduction block. In this study we treated four patients with an asymmetric, predominantly distal LMN syndrome associated with high serum titers of IgM anti-GM1 ganglioside antibodies but without conduction block on electrodiagnostic testing. Treatment courses consisted of five to seven repeated monthly regimens of plasma exchange on 2 consecutive days followed, on day 3, by intravenous cyclophosphamide (1 g/m2). The results of treatment were quantitatively measured using hand-held dynamometry. We found that all four patients showed progressive improvement in strength over the 6 to 24 months following treatment. Improvement was documented by both objective muscle testing and patient reports of increased strength and less fatigability. We conclude that immunotherapy may be followed by useful functional benefit in selected patients with an asymmetric, predominantly distal LMN syndrome associated with high serum titers of IgM anti-GM1 antibodies. Gradual improvement often begins as late as 6 to 9 months after the onset of treatment and may persist for 1 to 2 years, or longer, after immunosuppressive treatment is stopped.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2027-2031
Number of pages5
JournalNeurology
Volume44
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1994

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Plasma Exchange
Motor Neurons
Immunotherapy
Cyclophosphamide
Immunoglobulin M
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Serum
Therapeutics
G(M1) Ganglioside
Immunosuppressive Agents
Hand
Muscles
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Distal lower motor neuron syndrome with high-titer serum IgM anti-GM1 antibodies : Improvement following immunotherapy with monthly plasma exchange and intravenous cyclophosphamide. / Pestronk, A.; Lopate, G.; Kornberg, A. J.; Elliott, J. L.; Blume, G.; Yee, W. C.; Goodnough, L. T.

In: Neurology, Vol. 44, No. 11, 11.1994, p. 2027-2031.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kornberg, A. J.

AU - Elliott, J. L.

AU - Blume, G.

AU - Yee, W. C.

AU - Goodnough, L. T.

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