Distinguishing between major depressive disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder in children by measuring regional cortical thickness

Erin Fallucca, Frank P. MacMaster, Joseph Haddad, Phillip Easter, Rachel Dick, Geoffrey May, Jeffrey A. Stanley, Carrie Rix, David R. Rosenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context: Cortical abnormalities have been noted in previous studies of major depressive disorder (MDD). Objective: To hypothesize differences in regional cortical thickness among children with MDD, children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and healthy controls. Design: Cross-sectional study of groups. Setting: Children's Hospital of Michigan in Detroit. Participants: A total of 24 psychotropic drug-naive pediatric patients with MDD (9 boys and 15 girls), 24 psychotropic drug-naive pediatric outpatients with OCD (8 boys and 16 girls), and 30 healthy controls (10 boys and 20 girls). Intervention: Magnetic resonance imaging. Main Outcome Measure: Cortical thickness. Results: In the right hemisphere of the brain, the pericalcarine gyrus was thinner in patients with MDD than in outpatients with OCD (P=.002) or healthy controls (P=.04), the postcentral gyrus was thinner in patients with MDDthan in outpatients with OCD (P=.002) or healthy controls (P=.02), and the superior parietal gyrus was thinner in patients with MDD than in outpatients with OCD (P=.008) or healthy controls (P=.03). The outpatients with OCD and the healthy controls did not differ in these regions of the brain. The temporal pole was thicker in patients with MDD than in outpatients with OCD (P<.001) or healthy controls (P=.01), both of which groups did not differ in temporal pole thickness. The cuneus was thinner in patients with MDD than in outpatients with OCD (P=.008), but it did not differ from that in healthy controls. In the left hemisphere, the supramarginal gyrus was thinner in both patients with MDD (P=.04) and outpatients with OCD (P=.01) than in healthy controls, and the temporal pole was thicker in patients withMDDthan in both healthy controls and outpatients with OCD (P<.001). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to explore cortical thickness in pediatric patients with MDD. Although differences in some regions of the brain would be expected given neurobiological models of MDD, our study highlights some unexpected regions (ie, supramarginal and superior parietal gyri) that merit further investigation. These results underscore the need to expand exploration beyond the frontal-limbic circuit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-533
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume68
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Distinguishing between major depressive disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder in children by measuring regional cortical thickness'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this