Do baseline sub-threshold hypomanic symptoms affect acute-phase antidepressant outcome in outpatients with major depressive disorder? Preliminary findings from the randomized CO-MED trial

Manish K. Jha, Ashley L. Malchow, Bruce D. Grannemann, A. John Rush, Madhukar H. Trivedi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Sub-threshold hypomanic symptoms are common in major depressive disorder. This study evaluated the prevalence, the clinical and sociodemographic correlates, and the overall and differential effects of the presence/absence of sub-threshold hypomanic symptoms at baseline on acute-phase treatment outcomes with bupropion-plus-escitalopram combination, escitalopram monotherapy, and venlafaxine-plus-mirtazapine combination. Combining medications to enhance depression outcomes (CO-MED) trial participants (n = 665) were designated as sub-threshold hypomanic symptoms present (Altman Self-Rating Mania Scale score (ASRM) ≥ 1) or absent (ASRM = 0) and compared on clinical and sociodemographic features and remission rates. Participants with sub-threshold hypomanic symptoms (n = 335/665, 50.4%) were more likely to be black and non-Hispanic, have comorbid medical and psychiatric disorders, experience longer index episodes, and report lower depression severity and psychosocial impairment. Intent-to-treat remission rates were lower overall (absent = 42.7%, present = 34.0%, p = 0.02), with escitalopram monotherapy (absent = 45.8%, present = 31.6%, p = 0.03), and with venlafaxine-XR-plus-mirtazapine combination (absent = 44.4%, present = 30.1%, p = 0.03) but not with bupropion-plus-escitalopram combination (absent = 37.7%, present = 40.0%, p = 0.73). Participants without sub-threshold hypomanic symptoms were more likely to remit than those with such symptoms overall [odds ratio (OR) = 1.49], with escitalopram monotherapy (OR = 1.71), and with venlafaxine-plus-mirtazapine combination (OR = 1.97) but not with bupropion-plus-escitalopram combination (OR = 0.96), even after controlling for baseline depression severity, psychosocial impairment, and number of comorbid psychiatric disorders. Sub-threshold hypomanic symptoms (found in about 50% of patients in this report) were associated with lower remission rates with escitalopram monotherapy and with venlafaxine-plus-mirtazapine combination but not with the bupropion-plus-escitalopram combination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2197-2203
Number of pages7
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
Volume43
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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Citalopram
Major Depressive Disorder
Bupropion
Antidepressive Agents
Outpatients
Depression
Odds Ratio
Bipolar Disorder
Psychiatry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Venlafaxine Hydrochloride

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Do baseline sub-threshold hypomanic symptoms affect acute-phase antidepressant outcome in outpatients with major depressive disorder? Preliminary findings from the randomized CO-MED trial. / Jha, Manish K.; Malchow, Ashley L.; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Rush, A. John; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

In: Neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 43, No. 11, 01.10.2018, p. 2197-2203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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