Do children and adolescents have differential responsive rates in placebo-controlled trials of fluoxetine?

Taryn L. Mayes, Rongrong Tao, Jeanne W. Rintelmann, Thomas Carmody, Carroll W. Hughes, Beth D. Kennard, Sunita M. Stewart, Graham J. Emslie

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26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Recent acute efficacy trials of anti-depressants in youth have suggested that high placebo-response rates in children (<12 years of age) indicate that children may be more responsive to non-specific treatment interventions. Yet, these studies generally have not presented age-specific outcome data. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy outcomes for children (<12 years of age) and adolescents (≥12 years of age) using the combined data from two previously published double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of fluoxetine. Methods: Children (<12 years of age) and adolescents (≥12 years of age) with major depressive disorder were randomized to fluoxetine or placebo for 8-9 weeks of treatment. Outcome was assessed using the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) and Clinical Global Impressions scale. Results: Random regression of the CDRS-R showed a treatment group by age group interaction (F1,338=4.10, P=.044), indicating that the treatment effect was significantly more pronounced in children than adolescents. Within children, response at exit to fluoxetine was significantly better than placebo (56.9% vs 33.3%; P=.009). Adolescent response rates at exit were not significantly different between the groups (51.1% vs 38.6%; P=.128). Remission rates were low for both groups. Conclusion: In the combined fluoxetine trials, drug-placebo difference was greater in children compared with adolescents. Contrary to expectations, the placebo-response rate was lower in the children than the adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-154
Number of pages8
JournalCNS Spectrums
Volume12
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2007

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Fluoxetine
Placebos
Depression
Major Depressive Disorder
Therapeutics
Age Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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Do children and adolescents have differential responsive rates in placebo-controlled trials of fluoxetine? / Mayes, Taryn L.; Tao, Rongrong; Rintelmann, Jeanne W.; Carmody, Thomas; Hughes, Carroll W.; Kennard, Beth D.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Emslie, Graham J.

In: CNS Spectrums, Vol. 12, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 147-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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