Do geographic regions with higher suicide rates also have higher rates of nonfatal intentional self-harm?

Cynthia A. Claassen, Thomas Carmody, Robert Bossarte, Madhukar H. Trivedi, Stephen Elliott, Glenn W. Currier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fatal and nonfatal intentional self-harm events in eight U.S. states were compared using emergency department, hospital, and vital statistics data. Nonfatal event rates increased by an estimated 24.20% over 6 years. Case fatality ratios varied widely, but two northeastern states' total event rates (fatal plus nonfatal) were very high (New Hampshire 206.5/100,000 person years; Massachusetts 166.7/100,000). Geographic context did not uniformly impact the likelihood of self-harm across event types. The state-level public health burden posed by such acts cannot, therefore, be accurately estimated from either mortality or morbidity data alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)637-649
Number of pages13
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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